Posted in Real American Heroes

Alwyn C. Cashe Silver Star Citation

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant First Class Alwyn C. Cashe, United States Army, for exceptionally valorous achievement following an improvised explosive device explosion on 17 October 2005, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, during combat operations in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM. Sergeant First Class Cashe’s disregard for his own safety proved evident when he saved the lives of six fellow soldiers despite his serious injuries. His bravery is in keeping with the finest traditions of military heroism and reflect distinct credit upon himself, Task Force DRAGON, the SLEDGEHAMMER Brigade, Task Force LIBERTY, and the United States Army.

NARRATIVE TO ACCOMPANY AWARD: Sergeant First Class Alwyn Cashe heroically distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous conduct in the face of the enemy of the United States as a Platoon Sergeant in 1st Platoon, Alpha Company (HARDOCK), 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment stationed at Forward Operating Base MACKENZIE, Iraq, on 17 October 2005. On the evening of 17 October 2005, Sergeant First Class Cashe’s heroic actions saved the lives of six of his fellow soldiers. At approximately 1920 hours, 1st Platoon of Alpha Company, 1-15 Infantry departed FOB MACKENZIE to conduct a route clearance in the city of Daliaya, Iraq. Along Route JAIME, the lead Bradley Fighting Vehicle, of which Sergeant First Class Cashe was gunner having just moved from a NMC vehicle, struck a victim detonated pressure-switch IED at grid MC 25357243. The blast ignited the fuel cell on the vehicle causing fuel to spew everywhere. The vehicle came to a stop and immediately erupted in flames. Sergeant First Class Cashe was initially slightly injured and drenched with fuel. Despite his condition, he bravely managed to get out of the gunner’s hatch, crawl down the BFV and assist the driver out of the driver’s hatch. The driver had been burned and Sergeant First Class Cashe extinguished his flames. The following minutes were crucial. Six soldiers and a translator were in the back of the Bradley. Flames had engulfed the entire vehicle from the bottom and were coming out of every portal. The squad leader inside the vehicle managed to open the troop hatch door to help the soldiers escape. Without regard for his personal safety, Sergeant First Class Cashe rushed to the back of the vehicle, reaching into the hot flames and started pulling out his soldiers. The flames gripped his fuel soaked uniform. Flames quickly spread all over his body. Despite the terrible pain, Sergeant First Class Cashe placed the injured soldier on the ground and returned to the burning vehicle to retrieve another burning soldier; all the while, he was still on fire. A crew from a trail Bradley arrived within moments and assisted with CASEVAC. During all this and with severe burns, Sergeant First Class Cashe bravely continued to take control of the chaos. Within minutes, the company First Sergeant was on the scene and began to evacuate the seriously injured soldiers. One of which was Sergeant First Class Cashe. In the end, the national translator was killed in action, and 10 soldiers were injured. Seven of the ten were very seriously injured. Sergeant First Class Cashe stayed a hero through it all. His injuries were the worst as he suffered form 2d and 3d degree burns over 72% of his body. Sergeant First Class Cashe’s heroic actions saved the lives of six of his beloved soldiers. He is truly deserving of this award. His actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military heroism and reflect distinct credit upon himself, Task Force LIBERTY and the United States Army.

 


Born: July 13, 1970, Thompson, Ga…. Home of Record: Oviedo, Fla…. Departed Nov. 8, 2005 from wounds sustained in above actions… Buried: Restlawn Cemetery, Sanford, Fla.

Posted in Real American Heroes

Jeffrey M. Adamec Silver Star citation

THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

ESTABLISHED BY AN ACT OF CONGRESS 9 JULY 1918 (AMENDED BY ACT OF 25 JULY 1963) AND AWARDED BY THE
PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

SILVER STAR MEDAL

PRESENTED TO
STAFF SERGEANT JEFFREY M. ADAMEC
UNITED STATES ARMY

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Jeffrey M. Adamec, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company C, 3d Battalion, 3d Special Forces Group (Airborne), during combat operations in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, on 6 April 2003, at Debecka Pass, Iraq. Staff Sergeant Adamec destroyed four Iraqi armored personnel carriers and one enemy position with Javelin anti-tank missiles while under fire when his team attacked a fortified ridgeline in northern Iraq. Those actions helped secure an intersection linking Mosul and Kirkuk, Iraq. Staff Sergeant Adamec’s actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military heroism and reflect distinct credit upon himself, this Command, and the United States Army.


Read more about the Battle of Debecka Pass here

Posted in Real American Heroes

Bruce R. Taylor Silver Star citation

THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

ESTABLISHED BY AN ACT OF CONGRESS 9 JULY 1918 (AMENDED BY ACT OF 25 JULY 1963) AND AWARDED BY THE
PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

SILVER STAR MEDAL

PRESENTED TO
MAJOR BRUCE R. TAYLOR
UNITED STATES AIR FORCE

For gallantry in action in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with the 711th Special Operations Squadron near Baghdad, Iraq, on 2 April 2003. On that date, Major Taylor, as MC-130 Aircraft Commander of STEEL 73 flight, was tasked to support a package of four Special Forces MH-47s, infiltrating Navy SEALs, Army Special Forces and other government agents to the Iraqi leader’s Thar-Thar Palace, the suspecting hiding grounds for weapons of mass destruction. Major Taylor bravely led his MC-130E Combat Talon I aircraft into the heart of the Iraqi air defense and known SA-2, SA-3, and SA-8 sites to refuel the MH-47 package. As the second element lead, Major Taylor unhesitatingly flew his aircraft directly in the same airspace where a surface-to-air missile had just been launched at the formation lead aircraft. Once inside the previous engagement area and while performing low-level refueling, Major Taylor’s aircraft was fired upon by a suspected SA-8 surface-to-air missile. Utilizing his abundance of combat experience, he masked his presence over the helicopter package and continued to refuel the MH-47s. Because of the proximity of helicopters in trail below, the aircraft were able to disperse countermeasures, placing Major Taylor’s crew in grave danger of being destroyed by the launched missile. On night vision goggles, barely 400 feet above the ground, and under blowing dust, Major Taylor continued with the refueling mission knowing that by breaking off, the helicopters would face severe difficulty retrieving fuel and successfully completing their critical mission. Because of his actions, under extreme conditions while flying over a previous missile launch and also being targeted by a second missile launch, Major Taylor was a combat lighthouse guiding his crew and a Special Forces package through a storm of uncertainty. By his gallantry and devotion to duty, Major Taylor has reflected great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.