Environmental impact study

A U.S. Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt II with the U.S. Air Force Weapons School, Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., drops a AGM-65 Maverick missile during a close air support training mission Sept. 23, 2011, over the Nevada Test and Training Range.  U.S. Air Force Weapons School students participate in many combat training missions over  the NTTR during the six-month, graduate-level instructor course held at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Brett Clashman/Released)

A U.S. Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt II with the U.S. Air Force Weapons School, Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., drops a AGM-65 Maverick missile during a close air support training mission Sept. 23, 2011, over the Nevada Test and Training Range. U.S. Air Force Weapons School students participate in many combat training missions over the NTTR during the six-month, graduate-level instructor course held at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Brett Clashman/Released)

Posted on January 28, 2013 at 20:18 by Chris Carter · Permalink · 14 Comments
In: Images, Military · Tagged with: , ,

Bell X-1A

On Dec. 12, 1953, Maj. Chuck Yeager piloted the Bell X-1A to Mach 2.44 (1650 mph), setting a speed record.

Posted on December 11, 2011 at 13:33 by Chris Carter · Permalink · 15 Comments
In: Images, Military History · Tagged with: ,

Boneyard Stratojet

Boeing JQB-47E-45-BW Stratojet at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in September of 1968 (Photo use with permission of Neil Aird)

Check out more of Neil’s great photos of the “Boneyard” over 40 years ago.

Posted on September 9, 2011 at 01:21 by Chris Carter · Permalink · One Comment
In: Images, Military History · Tagged with: ,

Alaska Falcons

U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon fighters from the 18th Aggressor Squadron prepare for a simulated air war during exercise Red Flag-Alaska June 16, 2010, over Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Clay Lancaster/Released)

Posted on July 15, 2010 at 06:00 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
In: Images, Military · Tagged with: 

B-1B Lancers over New Mexico

A two ship of B-1B Lancers assigned to the 28th Bomb Squadron, Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, release chaff and flares while maneuvering over New Mexico during a training mission on Feb. 24, 2010. Dyess will celebrate the 25th anniversary of the first B-1B bomber arriving at the base with the Dyess Big Country Airfest and Open House on May 1, 2010. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Master Sgt. Kevin J. Gruenwald)

Posted on July 14, 2010 at 16:19 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
In: Images, Military · Tagged with: 

Thunderbirds perform the Calypso Pass

Air Force Thunderbirds lead solo pilot, Maj. Rick Goodman, and Capt. Aaron Jelinek, opposing solo, perform the Calypso Pass during the Dyess Big Country Air Fest May 1, 2010, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Stephen Reyes)

Posted on May 12, 2010 at 08:13 by Chris Carter · Permalink · One Comment
In: Images, Military · Tagged with: ,

Military Roundup

Photo of the Day: “Double ugly”

Moscow subway attack: Suicide bombers detonate two bombs in Moscow subway – at least 38 killed, 102 wounded. London Times: “Police in Moscow have identified CCTV footage of the two women suicide bombers who blew themselves up on packed underground trains this morning and said that they had been accompanied by other women.” (H/T United States Action)

South Korea’s government asks for help – U.S. ships respond to assist in search, recovery, and salvage efforts. The Cheonan lies in two pieces on the sea floor. 58 sailors – including the ship’s captain – have been rescued.

The Virginia-class attack submarine USS New Mexico (SSN 79) has joined the fleet. The New Mexico is the second so-named ship: the first New Mexico (BB-40) was a battleship that earned six battle stars during World War II.

96 percent of Afghans oppose the Taliban

Troops kill, capture militants, seize weapons / 27 Mar USAF Airpower Summary

President Obama pays surprise visit to troops in Afghanistan

USAF builds hospital in Chile large enough to serve 110,000 – in just three and a half days. After treating hundreds of patients and performing dozens of surgeries, the U.S. donated the hospital to Chile.

The Obama administration is laying out legal justification for drone attacks.

Albert Chestone – retired FBI special agent, World War II veteran, and author of What America Means To Me – discusses “current security concerns, how the FBI has changed in the last 30 years, what was J. Edgar Hoover like to work under, and why Americans need to realign their ‘compasses of life’ with the pillar of freedom in order to pass on a vital America to the next generation” on Sharon Hughes’ radio program, Changing Worldviews. Listen to the show. Buy the book.

Posted on March 29, 2010 at 15:56 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
In: Military Roundup · Tagged with: , , , ,

Double ugly

Two A-10C Thunderbolt II aircraft fly a flight training mission March 16, 2010, over Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The A-10C is the first Air Force aircraft specially designed for close-air support of ground forces. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Benjamin Wiseman)

Posted on March 29, 2010 at 15:16 by Chris Carter · Permalink · 6 Comments
In: Images, Military · Tagged with: ,

Military Milestones from Shay’s Rebellion to Looking Glass

From W. Thomas Smith, Jr.‘s “This Week in American Military History”:

Jan. 31, 1974:  The first of three U.S. Army Ranger battalions since World War II is activated.

Yes, there were post-war Rangers and Ranger units of varying sizes, but the modern battalion-organization is launched in 1974 by Gen. Creighton Abrams, who proclaims: “The Ranger battalion is to be an elite, light and [the] most proficient infantry battalion in the world; a battalion that can do things with its hands and weapons better than anyone. The battalion will contain no hoodlums or brigands, and if the battalion is formed of such persons it will be disbanded. Wherever the battalion goes it will be apparent that it is the best.”

Feb. 1, 1800:  The frigate USS Constellation (the first of four so-named American warships) under the command of Capt. Thomas Truxtun defeats the French frigate La Vengeance under Capt. F.M. Pitot in a night battle lasting several hours. The engagement, fought during America’s Quasi War with France, is — according to Truxtun — “as sharp an action as ever was fought between two frigates.”

Feb. 1, 1862:  Julia Ward Howe’s poem “Battle Hymn of the Republic,” which begins “Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord,” is published in the Atlantic Monthly. It will become a Union Army ballad. Today, the ballad is a martial hymn sung in American military chapels worldwide and by descendents of Union and Confederate soldiers alike.

Feb. 1, 1961:  The Minuteman I intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) — the first three-staged, solid-fueled ICBM — is launched for the first time in a successful “all systems” test.

Minuteman I is the first missile in the still-operational Minuteman family. Minuteman IIIs are still deployed. The name “Minuteman” comes from the famous “minutemen” of America’s colonial militia.

(more…)

Posted on February 2, 2010 at 10:05 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
In: Military History · Tagged with: , , , ,

Analyzing Pelosi’s travel tab

Recently released government documents show that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s travels cost more than $2.1 million. But why is the bill so high?

Based on my research of the documents, the aircraft most often used by Pelosi was the eight passenger C-37 – the military version of the luxurious Gulfstream V – which costs a whopping $5,594 per hour to operate. While that sounds expensive, it is certainly much more economical than the $20,000 per hour it costs to operate the 54-passenger military version of the Boeing 757 that Pelosi requested shortly after taking office.

The 757 is a vastly larger plane than the small Gulfstream jet that Pelosi’s predecessor Dennis Hastert used: when configured for commercial flight, a civilian 757 can carry almost 300 passengers.

Prior to 9/11, the Speaker actually flew commercial. With today’s heightened airline security risk, however it could be a national security risk for Pelosi to perhaps be seated alongside an al Qaeda suicide bomber. But let’s compare what the Air Force – and ultimately the taxpayer – is paying to fly her versus the costs of flying commercial. According to a search for airfare prices, a first-class ticket from Washington, D.C. to San Francisco only costs about $800. Now compare that to Pelosi’s average bill of $28,210.51 – one could fly 35 times for the price of one of her hops on the Air Force Gulfstream. And that’s without the alcohol, meals, snacks, newspapers, etc. that the Speaker, her family, and other fellow travelers incurred.

Regarding travel expenses, I usually stick to a Dr. Pepper and a maybe a piece of beef jerky if I eat anything at all. But Judicial Watch said Pelosi and her entourage managed to rack up an incredible $101,429.14 bill for in-flight expenses according to the receipts found in the documents. Apparently her Air Force transit seems to have become more of a luxurious party barge rather than the secure mode of transportation it was likely meant to be.

Bearing all that in mind, it seems outrageous for the military to spend that kind of money ferrying a politician and her family from Point A to Point B when there are surely more urgent needs for defense dollars on the battlefield.

[Originally published at The US Report]

Posted on February 1, 2010 at 09:29 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
In: Politics · Tagged with: , ,