Posted in Real American Heroes

John A. Chapman Medal of Honor citation


The President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pride in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR (Posthumously) to

TECHNICAL SERGEANT

JOHN A. CHAPMAN

UNITED STATES AIR FORCE

CITATION:

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pride in presenting the Medal of Honor (Posthumously) to Technical Sergeant John A. Chapman, United States Air Force, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of life above and beyond the call of duty. Technical Sergeant Chapman distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism as an Air Force Special Tactics Combat Controller of the 24th Special Tactics Squadron, attached to a Navy Sea, Air, and Land (SEAL) Team conducting reconnaissance operations in Takur Ghar, Afghanistan, on 4 March 2002. During insertion, the team’s helicopter was ambushed causing a teammate to fall into an entrenched group of enemy combatants below. Sergeant Chapman and the team voluntarily reinserted onto the snow-capped mountain, into the heart of a known enemy stronghold to rescue one of their own. Without regard for his own safety, Sergeant Chapman immediately engaged, moving in the direction of the closest enemy position despite coming under heavy fire from multiple directions. He fearlessly charged an enemy bunker, up a steep incline in thigh-deep snow and into hostile fire, directly engaging the enemy. Upon reaching the bunker, Sergeant Chapman assaulted and cleared the position, killing all enemy occupants. With complete disregard for his own life, Sergeant Chapman deliberately moved from cover only 12 meters from the enemy, and exposed himself once again to attack a second bunker, from which an emplaced machine gun was firing on his team. During this assault from an exposed position directly in the line of intense fire, Sergeant Chapman was struck and injured by enemy fire. Despite severe, mortal wounds, he continued to fight relentlessly, sustaining a violent engagement with multiple enemy personnel before making the ultimate sacrifice. By his heroic actions and extraordinary valor, sacrificing his life for the lives of his teammates, Technical Sergeant Chapman upheld the highest traditions of military service and reflected great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.


Born: 14 July 1965, Springfield, Mass…. Was the first Combat Controller to be awarded the Air Force Cross and one of two airmen to be awarded the Air Force Cross – both posthumously – during the Battle of Roberts Ridge… Upgraded to the Medal of Honor in 2018… Now the first member of the Air Force to earn the Medal of Honor since the Vietnam War… Interred at the St. Mary Byzantine Cemetery in Windber, Pa.

 

Posted in Real American Heroes

John Levitow Medal of Honor citation


The President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pleasure in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to

SERGEANT

JOHN LEE LEVITOW

AIR FORCE

For service as set forth in the following:

CITATION:

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Sergeant [then Airman First Class] John Lee Levitow, United States Air Force, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty serving with the 3d Special Operations Squadron, 14th Special Operations Wing, in the air over Long Binh Army Post, Republic of Vietnam, on 24 February 1969. Sergeant Levitow, U.S. Air Force, distinguished himself by exceptional heroism while assigned as a loadmaster aboard an AC-47 aircraft flying a night mission in support of Long Binh Army post. Sergeant Levitow’s aircraft was struck by a hostile mortar round. Continue reading “John Levitow Medal of Honor citation”

Posted in Real American Heroes

James P. Fleming Medal of Honor citation


The President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pleasure in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to

CAPTAIN

JAMES PHILLIP FLEMING

AIR FORCE

For service as set forth in the following:

CITATION:

For The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Captain [then First Lieutenant] James Phillip Fleming, United States Air Force, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with the 20th Special Operations Squadron, 14th Special Operations Wing, in action near Duc Co, Republic of Vietnam, on 26 November 1968. Captain Fleming distinguished himself as the Aircraft Commander of a UH-1F transport Helicopter. Captain Fleming went to the aid of a six-man special forces long range reconnaissance patrol that was in danger of being overrun by a large, heavily armed hostile force. Despite the knowledge that one helicopter had been downed by intense hostile fire, Captain Fleming descended, and balanced his helicopter on a river bank with the tail boom hanging over open water. The patrol could not penetrate to the landing site and he was forced to withdraw. Dangerously low on fuel, Captain Fleming repeated his original landing maneuver. Disregarding his own safety, he remained in this exposed position. Hostile fire crashed through his windscreen as the patrol boarded his helicopter. Captain Fleming made a successful takeoff through a barrage of hostile fire and recovered safely at a forward base. Captain Fleming’s profound concern for his fellowmen, and at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S. Air Force and reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of his country.


Born: Mar. 12, 1943 in Sedalia, Mo…. Also awarded the Silver Star, Distinguished Flying Cross, and eight Air Medals… Reached the rank of Colonel and retired in 1996

Posted in Real American Heroes

Joe M. Jackson Medal of Honor citation


The President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pleasure in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to

LIEUTENANT COLONEL

JOE MADISON JACKSON

AIR FORCE

For service as set forth in the following:

CITATION:

For The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Lieutenant Colonel Joe Madison Jackson, United States Air Force, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with the 311th Air Commando Squadron, 315th Special Operations Wing, in action at Kham Duc, Republic of Vietnam, on 12 May 1968. Lieutenant Colonel Jackson distinguished himself as Pilot of a C-123 aircraft. Lieutenant Colonel Jackson volunteered to attempt the rescue of a three-man USAF Combat Control Team from the special forces camp at Kham Duc. Hostile forces had overrun the forward outpost and established gun positions on the airstrip. They were raking the camp with small arms, mortars, light and heavy automatic weapons, and recoilless rifle fire. The camp was engulfed in flames and ammunition dumps were continuously exploding and littering the runway with debris. In addition, eight aircraft had been destroyed by the intense enemy fire and one aircraft remained on the runway reducing its usable length to only 2,200 feet. To further complicate the landing, the weather was deteriorating rapidly, thereby permitting only one air strike prior to his landing. Although fully aware of the extreme danger and likely failure of such an attempt. Lieutenant Colonel Jackson elected to land his aircraft and attempt to rescue. Displaying superb airmanship and extraordinary heroism, he landed his aircraft near the point where the combat control team was reported to be hiding. While on the ground, his aircraft was the target of intense hostile fire. A rocket landed in front of the nose of the aircraft but failed to explode. Once the combat control team was aboard, Lieutenant Colonel Jackson succeeded in getting airborne despite the hostile fire directed across the runway in front of his aircraft. Lieutenant Colonel Jackson’s profound concern for his fellowmen, at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S. Air Force and reflect great credit upon himself, and the Armed Forces of his country.


Born: 14 Mar. 1923, Newnan, Ga…. Enlisted in the Army Air Corps in 1941 and served as a B-25 crew chief during World War II… Became a commissioned officer and ended the war as a B-25 pilot… Flew 107 combat missions during the Korean War as an F-86 pilot… Flew 298 combat missions during the Vietnam War as a C-123 pilot.

Posted in Real American Heroes

Bernard F. Fisher Medal of Honor citation


The President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pleasure in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to

MAJOR

BERNARD FRANCIS FISHER

AIR FORCE

For service as set forth in the following:

CITATION:

For The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Major Bernard Francis Fisher, United States Air Force, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as Pilot with the 1st Air Commando Squadron, 14th Air Commando Wing, in action near Bien Hoa and Pleiku, Republic of Vietnam. On 10 March 1966, the special forces camp at A Shau was under attack by 2,000 North Vietnamese Army regulars. Hostile troops had positioned themselves between the airstrip and the camp. Other hostile troops had surrounded the camp and were continuously raking it with automatic weapons fire from the surrounding hills. The tops of the 1,500-foot hills were obscured by an 800 foot ceiling, limiting aircraft maneuverability and forcing pilots to operate within range of hostile gun positions, which often were able to fire down on the attacking aircraft. During the battle, Major Fisher observed a fellow airman crash land on the battle-torn airstrip. In the belief that the downed pilot was seriously injured and in imminent danger of capture, Major Fisher announced his intention to land on the airstrip to effect a rescue. Although aware of the extreme danger and likely failure of such an attempt, he elected to continue. Directing his own air cover, he landed his aircraft and taxied almost the full length of the runway, which was littered with battle debris and parts of an exploded aircraft. While effecting a successful rescue of the downed pilot, heavy ground fire was observed, with 19 bullets striking his aircraft. In the face of the withering ground fire, he applied power and gained enough speed to lift-off at the overrun of the airstrip. Major Fisher’s profound concern for his fellow airman, and at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty are in the highest traditions of the U.S. Air Force and reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of his country.


Born: 11 Jan. 1927,  San Bernardino, Calif…. Served in the Navy during World War II… Awarded Silver Star the day prior to his Medal of Honor actions… Also awarded Bronze Star, Air Medal, Distinguished Flying Cross… Was first member of the Air Force to receive the Medal of Honor… Retired as Colonel in 1974… Namesake of MV Maj. Bernard F. Fisher (T-AK-4396)… Departed Aug. 16, 2014… Interred at Idaho State Veteran’s Cemetery in Boise