Muddin’

Navy “SEAL” (Sea-Air-Land) Team Member moves through deep mud as he makes his way ashore from a boat, during a combat operation in South Vietnam in 1970. His gun is a Mk23 5.56mm Machine Gun (Stoner 63). Note his camouflage uniform & face paint. Photographed by PHC A. Hill.

A Navy SEAL, carrying a Mk23 5.56mm Machine Gun (Stoner 63), moves through deep mud as he makes his way ashore from a boat, during a combat operation in South Vietnam in 1970. (U.S. Navy photograph by PHC A. Hill)

Happy 51st birthday to the Navy SEALs, who were founded on Jan. 1, 1962.

Posted on January 2, 2013 at 11:19 by Chris Carter · Permalink · 2 Comments
In: Images, Military History · Tagged with: 

Ignore the controversy and read ‘No Easy Day’

Last year, members of the Navy SEAL elite counterterrorism unit set out on the mission America had waited for since September 11, 2001. We were finally going to get Osama bin Laden. Hours later, the leader of al Qaeda was in a body bag, and stories have circulated ever since on how the operation went down.

Considering the secrecy of our top-tier special operation forces, like SEAL Team Six, we were left to guess which of those accounts were accurate – if any truly were.

Former SEAL Matt Bissonnette was not just there, but saw bin Laden go down. Writing under the pseudonym Mark Owen, he published a detailed and accurate account of the battle, No Easy Day.

Although No Easy Day has all the detail and excitement of a Tom Clancy novel, from the near-fatal helicopter crash on insertion to evading the Pakistani air force on the return trip, the author avoids disclosing anything that could be used by the enemy.

The Pentagon claims the author violated nondisclosure agreements and has threatened legal action. Mr. Bissonnette and his lawyers assert that he did not.

That is for the lawyers to decide.

Members of the SEAL community have spoken out about the author’s decision to publish, saying he violated the SEAL Ethos: “I do not advertise the nature of my work, nor seek recognition for my actions…”

I am not a SEAL, so I leave that to Bissonnette and his former teammates to work out.

What I can say is that No Easy Day is… [Read the rest at The US Report]

Posted on October 5, 2012 at 17:32 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
In: Book Reviews · Tagged with: 

AP’s propaganda piece on SEAL trial

On Thursday, the Associated (with Terrorists) Press published an article on a military jury finding Navy SEAL Petty Officer Julio Huertas not guilty of covering up an alleged detainee beating.

But the AP just couldn’t help but turn a story where justice prevailed into a propaganda piece attacking the U.S. military. Kay Day at The US Report writes:

Things were going pretty good until I got to this part: “The case has drawn fire from at least 20 members of Congress and other Americans who see it as coddling terrorists to overcompensate for the notorious Abu Ghraib prison scandal. Thursday’s verdict was met by anger and sad shrugs from Iraqis who said they no longer expect to see U.S. troops held accountable for atrocities or other abuses.”

At least 20  members of Congress? Try at least 40 members, and just for fun, add in the fact they are Republicans who supported the SEALs based on evidence compiled by Rep. Dan Burton (R-Ind.). I know that puts a small grimace on most wire service writers’ faces, but it’s a fact and journalists love facts, right?

Day continues (emphasis mine):

And naturally this social justice loving AP writer had to bring up Abu Ghraib—the word ‘notorious’ does seem a bit ‘overkillish’ to me, however. The very name of the place connotes ‘notorious.’ But to compare [Abu Ghraib with] an alleged punch to a detainee who suffered no real injury and whose storychanged with the wind is akin to comparing a firm handshake to a punch thrown by the great Muhammad Ali.

The AP writes, “In his closing argument, [the prosecutor, Navy Lt. Cmdr. Jason Grover] pleaded with the jury to hold Huertas responsible as an example of ‘why we’re better than the terrorists.'”

To hell with justice – let’s show the Iraqis that we will do whatever it takes to please them! The trouble with that logic is the Obama administration has turned placating other nations and our enemies into our foreign policy platform, and it clearly doesn’t work.

Sidenote to Grover and the AP: There’s a thing called justice. That’s one key asset that makes us better than the terrorists.

Then there’s this thing called a jury trial which should never have happened in the first place.

Then there’s another thing called a head. The so-called detainee still has his on top of his body. I’d say that’s the biggest thing making us better than the terrorists.

And why does this lawyer – who happens to be in the Navy – think we need to prove to the Iraqis that we are better than the terrorists? Justice aside – who dethroned their tyrannical government, allowing a democracy to take its place – al Qaeda or the United States? Who destroys infrastructure and terrorizes the population, and who repairs and builds infrastructure and protects the population? Perhaps Lt. Cmdr. Grover should refresh his memory. Or perhaps he is just following orders. Who knows any more?

While trying to paint the alleged crime as revenge for the 2004 grisly massacre of four Blackwater security contractors- of which the alleged victim is believed to have been the mastermind – the AP mistakenly claimed that at least two of the slain Americans were SEALs. In fact, three of the four were former Army. Only one was a SEAL. It’s pretty bad when a blog has more accurate reporting than the AP.

But the real kicker is what the news service wrote next: “‘These trials are just propaganda for their justice and democracy,’ sneered Abdul-Rahman Najim al-Mashhadani, head of the Iraqi human rights group Hammurabi.'”

Time magazine reported that Hammurabi was linked to the (George Soros-linked) Human Rights Watch. When Time used Hammurabi statements during a story on Haditha, they issued a retraction. In closing, here’s what Day had to say:

I’d like to congratulate the AP for continuing a level of reportage I’ve come to expect from an organization that runs content from partisan non-profit organizations without disclosing it to the reader. You did the usual sorry job on informing the reader and you managed to once again slap the very men and women that keep this country free enough for you to write your garbage.

If you would like to let the AP what you think of what they consider “journalism,” their phone number is 212-621-1500, and their email address is info@ap.org

Posted on April 23, 2010 at 11:04 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
In: Media, Military · Tagged with: , , ,

From the Management

Image courtesy of Blackfive

‘‘Attention to all who enter here. If you are coming into this room with sorrow or to feel sorry for my wounds, go elsewhere. The wounds I received I got in a job I love, doing it for people I love, supporting the freedom of a country I deeply love. I am incredibly tough and will make a full recovery. What is full? That is the absolute utmost physically my body has the ability to recover. Then I will push that about 20 percent further through sheer mental tenacity. This room you are about to enter is a room of fun, optimism, and intense rapid regrowth. If you are not prepared for that, go elsewhere. From: The Management”

Navy SEAL Lt. Jason ‘‘Jay” Redman was wounded in Iraq in 2007, hit by multiple bullets in the face and arm. According to a February 2009 article from DCmilitary.com, Redman “endured 25 surgeries with at least 10 more expected, Redman’s treatment has included about 1,200 stitches, 200 staples, 15 skin grafts and one tracheotomy that he wore for seven months and two days.”

Redman’s jaw has been shattered, broken or re-broken three times and was wired shut for 12 weeks. He lost over 50 pounds, spent 143 hours in surgery under anesthesia in the past 15 months and spent 73 days at NNMC. This small portion of treatment only scratches the surface of the recuperation that Redman has undergone.

Posted on April 13, 2010 at 15:20 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
In: Images, Military · Tagged with: 

Damn the evidence, full speed ahead!

An update on the SEAL 3 courts-martials: the prosecution’s paper-thin case has taken several more blows recently, but the prosecution limps forward, nonetheless. From The US Report:

At a Scottsdale, Ariz. rally on Saturday, Petty Officer Matthew McCabe – the only SEAL actually accused of striking the detainee – announced that he passed an independently-administered polygraph on March 16.

Additionally, one of the two charges against fellow SEAL Jonathan Keefe has been dropped, as the investigator failed to inform Keefe of his right to remain silent. The same NCIS investigator admitted that he also failed to inform Julio Huertas – the third charged SEAL – of his right to remain silent, so his charges could be dropped as well.

And McCabe’s attorney also informed me that last week the defense’s key witnesses – four SEALs and a Navy Corpsman – were granted immunity and would testify on behalf of the accused SEALs.

All that remains now is the word of a terrorist, who is trained to fake abuse, and a Master-at-Arms Third Class who has given five conflicting statements.

Posted on March 30, 2010 at 11:38 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
In: Military · Tagged with: , , , ,

Falsification charges dropped against SEAL Keefe

Recent developments have further weakened the case against three Navy SEALs charged with assaulting an al Qaeda detainee. One development will impact the case for all three—the inadmissibility of a statement given by Petty Officer Jonathan Keefe.

At a Scottsdale, Ariz. rally on Saturday, Petty Officer Matthew McCabe – the only SEAL actually accused of striking the detainee – announced that he passed an independently-administered polygraph on March 16.

Neal Puckett, McCabe’s attorney told The US Report, “No military polygraph was administered.”

SEALs captured Ahmed Hashim Abed without firing a shot in a 2009 nighttime raid. Abed is believed to be responsible for the grisly 2004 ambush in Iraq where four security contractors were murdered and their bodies mutilated. Once in U.S. custody, Abed claimed to have received  injuries that court documents state amount to a punch in the stomach.

More than 150 supporters attended the event despite the venue’s limited seating. Congressman John Shadegg (R – Ariz.), one of the event’s speakers, stated that trying these SEALs in a case like this is “creating our own demise.” Shadegg is one of 77 co-sponsors of HR 977, a bipartisan bill introduced by Rep. Ted Poe (R-Tex.). HR 977 honors McCabe, Huertas, and Keefe for their “heroic actions.” The bill was introduced in December, and has been referred to committee.

(more…)

Night at the movies

Tonight’s feature: U.S. Navy SEALs: Direct Action

Why watch the anti-military filth perpetrated on us by Hollywood pinkos? Tuck the women and children into bed. Grab an ice-cold beverage, a steak (substitute more economical meat product if necessary – I know I will), and enjoy this five-part series of Navy SEALs doing their thing. Note: parts 2 through 5 are available after the jump. Enterprising individuals may be able to watch on full screen, but results may vary.

Part 1

(more…)

Posted on March 28, 2010 at 19:40 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
In: Military · Tagged with: 

SEAL 3 courts-martials are drumhead trials

In September, 2009, members of SEAL Team 3 captured Ahmed Hashim Abed, the man believed to be the mastermind of the 2004 Fallujah ambush where four Americans were murdered and their bodies mutilated and hung from a bridge. Although Abed was armed, the SEALs apprehended him without firing a shot.

However, the military has brought charges against three of the SEALs involved in Abed’s detention. As the al Qaeda training manual instructs, Abed has claimed that he was abused. According to court documents, his injuries amount to a punch in the stomach.

Rightfully so, the convening authority of the courts-martial has since deemed that Abed will not be present at the trial, and his statements will not be allowed as evidence.

But in the meantime, the military has offered no corroborating evidence, such as photos or medical reports, to support the prosecution. All it appears they have now is five conflicting statements by a sailor that claims to have witnessed the incident. There is also a chain of custody issue: Before being transferred to U.S. custody, Abed was initially detained at an Iraqi facility. If Abed truly was struck, how can the military know for sure that the alleged injury didn’t take place during his stay with the Iraqis?

The SEALs were initially offered an Article 15 hearing. Although it carried lesser punishments, accepting the hearing would have been viewed as an admission of guilt. Instead, the SEALs chose to have a trial by courts-martial, where all the evidence would be considered, but the punishments are significantly more severe.

These fine operators have experienced far more pain and suffering during any given moment of any training evolution than what this terrorist has alleged. How can we invest years and millions of dollars honing the skills of these elite warriors, only to ruin their careers over accusations of our enemies?

If the SEALs wanted to rough up Abed, they could have done so prior to or during his capture. But they didn’t. Then they could have accepted the Article 15 hearing and perhaps continued serving in their unit. But they didn’t.

The American public is against these trials. Congress has sent multiple letters to our military and political leaders. Members of the special warfare community have privately expressed that this trial has already negatively affected the way they do business. Does our leadership really want to put the words of an al Qaeda operative over our country’s national security?

It is a travesty that the military allowed this trial to go forward. Basing a case on the word of a terrorist, conflicting statements, chain of custody issues, and no corroborating evidence is a slap in the face of our fighting forces. This courts-martial will serve to embolden our enemies, and will undermine the effectiveness of our armed forces.

Chris Carter
Director, The Victory Institute

Former SEAL: court martial ‘sends horrible message’

Follow the latest on the SEAL 3 courts-martial at the VI Newsdesk.

Posted on March 24, 2010 at 11:13 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
In: Military · Tagged with: , ,

Accused Navy SEAL appears on Fox News

Read all about the plight of the SEAL 3 at the Victory Institute.

(more…)

Posted on March 8, 2010 at 13:04 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
In: Military · Tagged with: , ,