Posted in Real American Heroes

James P. Fleming Medal of Honor citation


The President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pleasure in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to

CAPTAIN

JAMES PHILLIP FLEMING

AIR FORCE

For service as set forth in the following:

CITATION:

For The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Captain [then First Lieutenant] James Phillip Fleming, United States Air Force, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with the 20th Special Operations Squadron, 14th Special Operations Wing, in action near Duc Co, Republic of Vietnam, on 26 November 1968. Captain Fleming distinguished himself as the Aircraft Commander of a UH-1F transport Helicopter. Captain Fleming went to the aid of a six-man special forces long range reconnaissance patrol that was in danger of being overrun by a large, heavily armed hostile force. Despite the knowledge that one helicopter had been downed by intense hostile fire, Captain Fleming descended, and balanced his helicopter on a river bank with the tail boom hanging over open water. The patrol could not penetrate to the landing site and he was forced to withdraw. Dangerously low on fuel, Captain Fleming repeated his original landing maneuver. Disregarding his own safety, he remained in this exposed position. Hostile fire crashed through his windscreen as the patrol boarded his helicopter. Captain Fleming made a successful takeoff through a barrage of hostile fire and recovered safely at a forward base. Captain Fleming’s profound concern for his fellowmen, and at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S. Air Force and reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of his country.


Born: Mar. 12, 1943 in Sedalia, Mo…. Also awarded the Silver Star, Distinguished Flying Cross, and eight Air Medals… Reached the rank of Colonel and retired in 1996

Posted in Real American Heroes

Billie G. Kanell Medal of Honor citation

Army MOH CitationThe President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pride in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR posthumously to

PRIVATE

BILLIE GENE KANELL

ARMY

for service as set forth in the following

CITATION:

For The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pride in presenting the Medal of Honor (Posthumously) to Private Billie Gene Kanell (ASN: RA-17317531), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and outstanding courage above and beyond the call of duty while serving with Company I, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, in action against enemy aggressor forces at Pyongyang, Korea, on 7 September 1951. A numerically superior hostile force had launched a fanatical assault against friendly positions, supported by mortar and artillery fire, when Private Kanell stood in his emplacement exposed to enemy observation and action and delivered accurate fire into the ranks of the assailants. An enemy grenade was hurled into his emplacement and Private Kanell threw himself upon the grenade, absorbing the blast with his body to protect two of his comrades from serious injury and possible death. A few seconds later another grenade was thrown into the emplacement and, although seriously wounded by the first missile, he summoned his waning strength to roll toward the second grenade and used his body as a shield to again protect his comrades. He was mortally wounded as a result of his heroic actions. His indomitable courage, sustained fortitude against overwhelming odds, and gallant self-sacrifice reflect the highest credit upon himself, the infantry, and the United States Army.


Born: June 26, 1931 in Poplar Bluff, Mo…. Interred at Fairdealing Cemetery in Fairdealing, Mo.

Posted in Real American Heroes

Richard G. Wilson Medal of Honor citation

Army MOH CitationThe President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pride in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR posthumously to

PRIVATE FIRST CLASS

RICHARD GENE WILSON

ARMY

for service as set forth in the following

CITATION:

For The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pride in presenting the Medal of Honor (Posthumously) to Private First Class Richard Gene Wilson (ASN: 17252005), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty while serving with Medical Company, 187th Airborne Infantry Regiment, 11th Airborne Division, in action against enemy aggressor forces at Opari, Korea, on 21 October 1950. As medical aid man attached to Company I, Private First Class Wilson accompanied the unit during a reconnaissance in force through the hilly country near Opari. The main body of the company was passing through a narrow valley flanked on three sides by high hills when the enemy laid down a barrage of mortar, automatic-weapons and small-arms fire. The company suffered a large number of casualties from the intense hostile fire while fighting its way out of the ambush. Private First Class Wilson proceeded at once to move among the wounded and administered aid to them oblivious of the danger to himself, constantly exposing himself to hostile fire. The company commander ordered a withdrawal as the enemy threatened to encircle and isolate the company. As his unit withdrew Private Wilson assisted wounded men to safety and assured himself that none were left behind. After the company had pulled back he learned that a comrade previously thought dead had been seen to be moving and attempting to crawl to safety. Despite the protests of his comrades, unarmed and facing a merciless enemy, Private First Class Wilson returned to the dangerous position in search of his comrade. Two days later a patrol found him lying beside the man he returned to aid. He had been shot several times while trying to shield and administer aid to the wounded man. Private First Class Wilson’s superb personal bravery, consummate courage and willing self-sacrifice for his comrades reflect untold glory upon himself and uphold the esteemed traditions of the military service.


Born: Aug. 19, 1931 in Marion, Ill…. Interred at Cape Girardeau County Memorial Park in Cape Girardeau, Mo.

Posted in Real American Heroes

Samuel G. Fuqua Medal of Honor citation

Navy MOH Citation

The President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pleasure in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to

CAPTAIN

SAMUEL GLENN FUQUA

NAVY

for service as set forth in the following

CITATION:

For The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Captain Samuel Glenn Fuqua, United States Navy, for distinguished conduct in action, outstanding heroism, and utter disregard of his own safety above and beyond the call of duty during the attack on the Fleet in Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, by Japanese forces on 7 December 1941. Upon the commencement of the attack, Lieutenant Commander Fuqua rushed to the quarterdeck of the U.S.S. ARIZONA (BB-39) to which he was attached where he was stunned and knocked down by the explosion of a large bomb which hit the guarterdeck, penetrated several decks, and started a severe fire. Upon regaining consciousness, he began to direct the fighting of the fire and the rescue of wounded and injured personnel. Almost immediately there was a tremendous explosion forward, which made the ship appear to rise out of the water, shudder, and settle down by the bow rapidly. The whole forward part of the ship was enveloped in flames which were spreading rapidly, and wounded and burned men were pouring out of the ship to the quarterdeck. Despite these conditions, his harrowing experience, and severe enemy bombing and strafing, at the time, Lieutenant Commander Fuqua continued to direct the fighting of fires in order to check them while the wounded and burned could be taken from the ship and supervised the rescue of these men in such an amazingly calm and cool manner and with such excellent judgment that it inspired everyone who saw him and undoubtedly resulted in the saving of many lives. After realizing the ship could not be saved and that he was the senior surviving officer aboard, he directed it to be abandoned, but continued to remain on the quarterdeck and directed abandoning ship and rescue of personnel until satisfied that all personnel that could be had been saved, after which he left his ship with the boatload. The conduct of Lieutenant Commander Fuqua was not only in keeping with the highest traditions of the naval service but characterizes him as an outstanding leader of men.


Born: Oct. 15, 1899, Laddonia, Mo…. Served in the Army during World War I… Graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy, Class of 1923… Commanded the minesweeper USS Bittern and the destroyer tender USS Dixie… Retired as Rear Admiral in July 1953… Departed: Jan. 27, 1987… Interred at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va.

Posted in Real American Heroes

Sgt. Michael B. Ellis’ Medal of Honor citation

Army MOH CitationThe President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pleasure in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to

SERGEANT

MICHAEL B ELLIS

ARMY

for service as set forth in the following

CITATION:

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Sergeant Michael B. Ellis (ASN: 56976), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism on 5 October 1918, while serving with Company C, 28th Infantry, 1st Division, in action at Exermont, France. During the entire day’s engagement Sergeant Ellis operated far in advance of the first wave of his company, voluntarily undertaking most dangerous missions and single-handedly attacking and reducing machinegun nests. Flanking one emplacement, he killed two of the enemy with rifle fire and captured 17 others. Later he single-handedly advanced under heavy fire and captured 27 prisoners, including two officers and six machineguns, which had been holding up the advance of the company. The captured officers indicated the locations of four other machineguns, and he in turn captured these, together with their crews, at all times showing marked heroism and fearlessness.


Born: Oct. 28, 1894 in St. Louis, Mo…. Enlisted in the Army in 1912… Also awarded the Silver Star, the French Chevalier Legion of Honor, and the Croix de Guerre with Palm (also France), Italy’s Cross of War, Poland’s Cross of War, as well as decorations from Morocco… Ultimately reached the rank of 1st Sgt…. Departed: Dec. 9, 1937… Interred at Arlington National Cemetery