Posted in Real American Heroes

Dan D. Schoonover Medal of Honor citation

Army MOH CitationThe President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pride in presenting the

THE MEDAL OF HONOR (Posthumously)

to

CORPORAL DAN DWAIN SCHOONOVER
UNITED STATES ARMY

for service as set forth in the following

CITATION:

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pride in presenting the Medal of Honor (Posthumously) to Corporal Dan Dwain Schoonover (ASN: 19395830), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and outstanding courage above and beyond the call of duty while serving with Company G, 17th Infantry, 7th Infantry Division, in action against enemy aggressor forces at Pork Chop Hill, Sokkogae, Korea, from 8 July to 10 July 1953. Corporal Schoonover was in charge of an engineer demolition squad attached to an infantry company which was committed to dislodge the enemy from a vital hill. Realizing that the heavy fighting and intense enemy fire made it impossible to carry out his mission, he voluntarily employed his unit as a rifle squad and, forging up the steep barren slope, participated in the assault on hostile positions. Continue reading “Dan D. Schoonover Medal of Honor citation”

Posted in Real American Heroes

Ola L. Mize Medal of Honor citation

Army MOH Citation

The President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pleasure in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to

MASTER SERGEANT

OLA LEE MIZE

ARMY

for service as set forth in the following

CITATION:

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Sergeant Major Ola Lee Mize, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and outstanding courage above and beyond the call of duty while serving with Company K, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, in action against enemy aggressor forces at Surang-ni, Korea, on 10 and 11 June 1953. Company K was committed to the defense of “Outpost Harry”, a strategically valuable position, when the enemy launched a heavy attack. Learning that a comrade on a friendly listening post had been wounded Sergeant Major Mize moved through the intense barrage, accompanied by a medical aid man, and rescued the wounded soldier. On returning to the main position he established an effective defense system and inflicted heavy casualties against attacks from determined enemy assault forces which had penetrated into trenches within the outpost area. During his fearless actions he was blown down by artillery and grenade blasts three times but each time he dauntlessly returned to his position, tenaciously fighting and successfully repelling hostile attacks. When enemy onslaughts ceased he took his few men and moved from bunker to bunker, firing through apertures and throwing grenades at the foe, neutralizing their positions. When an enemy soldier stepped out behind a comrade, prepared to fire, Master Sergeant Mize killed him, saving the life of his fellow soldier. After rejoining the platoon, moving from man to man, distributing ammunition, and shouting words of encouragement he observed a friendly machinegun position overrun. He immediately fought his way to the position, killing ten of the enemy and dispersing the remainder. Fighting back to the command post, and finding several friendly wounded there, he took a position to protect them. Later, securing a radio, he directed friendly artillery fire upon the attacking enemy’s routes of approach. At dawn he helped regroup for a counterattack which successfully drove the enemy from the outpost. Master Sergeant Mize’s valorous conduct and unflinching courage reflect lasting glory upon himself and uphold the noble traditions of the military service.


Born: Aug. 28, 1931 in Albertville, Ala…. Awarded by Pres. Dwight Eisenhower on Sept. 7, 1954… Earned his commission in 1956… Served three tours in Vietnam with the Special Forces… Also earned the Silver Star, five Bronze Stars, and Purple Heart… Retired as colonel in 1981… Departed Mar. 12, 2014

Posted in Real American Heroes

William R. Charette Medal of Honor citation

Navy MOH CitationThe President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pleasure in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to

HOSPITAL CORPSMAN THIRD CLASS

WILLIAM RICHARD CHARETTE

NAVY

for service as set forth in the following

CITATION:

For The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Hospital Corpsman Third Class William Richard Charette, United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as a Medical Corpsman with Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea during the early morning hours on 27 March 1953. Participating in a fierce encounter with a cleverly concealed and well-entrenched enemy force occupying positions on a vital and bitterly contested outpost far in advance of the main line of resistance, Hospital Corpsman Third Class. Charette repeatedly and unhesitatingly moved about through a murderous barrage of hostile small-arms and mortar fire to render assistance to his wounded comrades. When an enemy grenade landed within a few feet of a marine he was attending, he immediately threw himself upon the stricken man and absorbed the entire concussion of the deadly missile with his body. Although sustaining painful facial wounds, and undergoing shock from the intensity of the blast which ripped the helmet and medical aid kit from his person, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Charette resourcefully improvised emergency bandages by tearing off part of his clothing, and gallantly continued to administer medical aid to the wounded in his own unit and to those in adjacent platoon areas as well. Observing a seriously wounded comrade whose armored vest had been torn from his body by the blast from an exploding shell, he selflessly removed his own battle vest and placed it upon the helpless man although fully aware of the added jeopardy to himself. Moving to the side of another casualty who was suffering excruciating pain from a serious leg wound, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Charette stood upright in the trench line and exposed himself to a deadly hail of enemy fire in order to lend more effective aid to the victim and to alleviate his anguish while being removed to a position of safety. By his indomitable courage and inspiring efforts in behalf of his wounded comrades, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Charette was directly responsible for saving many lives. His great personal valor reflects the highest credit upon himself and enhances the finest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service.


Born: Mar. 29, 1932, Ludington, Mich…. Selected the World War II remains that would be interred in the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery… Retired as Master Chief Hospital Corpsman in 1977… Departed: Mar. 18, 2012… Interred at Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell, Fla.

Posted in Real American Heroes

Ernest E. West Medal of Honor citation

Army MOH Citation

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Private Ernest Edison West (ASN: 52151286), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry above and beyond the call of duty while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, in action against enemy aggressor forces at Sataeri, Korea, on 12 October 1952. Private West voluntarily accompanied a contingent to locate and destroy a reported enemy outpost. Nearing the objective, the patrol was ambushed and suffered numerous casualties. Observing his wounded leader lying in an exposed position, Private First Class West ordered the troops to withdraw, then braved intense fire to reach and assist him. While attempting evacuation, he was attacked by three hostile soldiers employing grenades and small-arms fire. Quickly shifting his body to shelter the officer, he killed the assailants with his rifle, then carried the helpless man to safety. He was critically wounded and lost an eye in this action, but courageously returned through withering fire and bursting shells to assist the wounded. While evacuating two comrades, he closed with and killed three more of the foe. Private First Class West’s indomitable spirit, consummate valor, and intrepid actions inspired all who observed him, reflect the highest credit on himself, and uphold the honored traditions of the military service.


ewestBorn: Sept. 2, 1931 in Russell, Ky…. Discharged in 1953… Awarded at the White House on Jan. 12, 1954 by President Dwight Eisenhower… Also received the Purple Heart… Resides in Wurtland, Ky.

Posted in Real American Heroes

Earnest E. West Medal of Honor citation

Army MOH Citation

The President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pleasure in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to

PRIVATE

ERNEST EDISON WEST

ARMY

for service as set forth in the following

CITATION:
The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Private Ernest Edison West (ASN: 52151286), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry above and beyond the call of duty while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, in action against enemy aggressor forces at Sataeri, Korea, on 12 October 1952. Private West voluntarily accompanied a contingent to locate and destroy a reported enemy outpost. Nearing the objective, the patrol was ambushed and suffered numerous casualties. Observing his wounded leader lying in an exposed position, Private First Class West ordered the troops to withdraw, then braved intense fire to reach and assist him. While attempting evacuation, he was attacked by three hostile soldiers employing grenades and small-arms fire. Quickly shifting his body to shelter the officer, he killed the assailants with his rifle, then carried the helpless man to safety. He was critically wounded and lost an eye in this action, but courageously returned through withering fire and bursting shells to assist the wounded. While evacuating two comrades, he closed with and killed three more of the foe. Private First Class West’s indomitable spirit, consummate valor, and intrepid actions inspired all who observed him, reflect the highest credit on himself, and uphold the honored traditions of the military service.


ewestBorn: Sept. 2, 1931 in Russell, Ky…. Discharged in 1953… Awarded at the White House on Jan. 12, 1954 by President Dwight Eisenhower… Also received the Purple Heart… Resides in Wurtland, Ky.