Posted in Men of Valor

Ola L. Mize Medal of Honor citation

Army MOH Citation

The President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pleasure in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to

MASTER SERGEANT

OLA LEE MIZE

ARMY

for service as set forth in the following

CITATION:

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Sergeant Major Ola Lee Mize, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and outstanding courage above and beyond the call of duty while serving with Company K, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, in action against enemy aggressor forces at Surang-ni, Korea, on 10 and 11 June 1953. Company K was committed to the defense of “Outpost Harry”, a strategically valuable position, when the enemy launched a heavy attack. Learning that a comrade on a friendly listening post had been wounded Sergeant Major Mize moved through the intense barrage, accompanied by a medical aid man, and rescued the wounded soldier. On returning to the main position he established an effective defense system and inflicted heavy casualties against attacks from determined enemy assault forces which had penetrated into trenches within the outpost area. During his fearless actions he was blown down by artillery and grenade blasts three times but each time he dauntlessly returned to his position, tenaciously fighting and successfully repelling hostile attacks. When enemy onslaughts ceased he took his few men and moved from bunker to bunker, firing through apertures and throwing grenades at the foe, neutralizing their positions. When an enemy soldier stepped out behind a comrade, prepared to fire, Master Sergeant Mize killed him, saving the life of his fellow soldier. After rejoining the platoon, moving from man to man, distributing ammunition, and shouting words of encouragement he observed a friendly machinegun position overrun. He immediately fought his way to the position, killing ten of the enemy and dispersing the remainder. Fighting back to the command post, and finding several friendly wounded there, he took a position to protect them. Later, securing a radio, he directed friendly artillery fire upon the attacking enemy’s routes of approach. At dawn he helped regroup for a counterattack which successfully drove the enemy from the outpost. Master Sergeant Mize’s valorous conduct and unflinching courage reflect lasting glory upon himself and uphold the noble traditions of the military service.


Born: Aug. 28, 1931 in Albertville, Ala…. Awarded by Pres. Dwight Eisenhower on Sept. 7, 1954… Earned his commission in 1956… Served three tours in Vietnam with the Special Forces… Also earned the Silver Star, five Bronze Stars, and Purple Heart… Retired as colonel in 1981… Departed Mar. 12, 2014

Posted in Men of Valor

William R. Charette Medal of Honor citation

Navy MOH CitationThe President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pleasure in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to

HOSPITAL CORPSMAN THIRD CLASS

WILLIAM RICHARD CHARETTE

NAVY

for service as set forth in the following

CITATION:

For The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Hospital Corpsman Third Class William Richard Charette, United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as a Medical Corpsman with Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea during the early morning hours on 27 March 1953. Participating in a fierce encounter with a cleverly concealed and well-entrenched enemy force occupying positions on a vital and bitterly contested outpost far in advance of the main line of resistance, Hospital Corpsman Third Class. Charette repeatedly and unhesitatingly moved about through a murderous barrage of hostile small-arms and mortar fire to render assistance to his wounded comrades. When an enemy grenade landed within a few feet of a marine he was attending, he immediately threw himself upon the stricken man and absorbed the entire concussion of the deadly missile with his body. Although sustaining painful facial wounds, and undergoing shock from the intensity of the blast which ripped the helmet and medical aid kit from his person, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Charette resourcefully improvised emergency bandages by tearing off part of his clothing, and gallantly continued to administer medical aid to the wounded in his own unit and to those in adjacent platoon areas as well. Observing a seriously wounded comrade whose armored vest had been torn from his body by the blast from an exploding shell, he selflessly removed his own battle vest and placed it upon the helpless man although fully aware of the added jeopardy to himself. Moving to the side of another casualty who was suffering excruciating pain from a serious leg wound, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Charette stood upright in the trench line and exposed himself to a deadly hail of enemy fire in order to lend more effective aid to the victim and to alleviate his anguish while being removed to a position of safety. By his indomitable courage and inspiring efforts in behalf of his wounded comrades, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Charette was directly responsible for saving many lives. His great personal valor reflects the highest credit upon himself and enhances the finest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service.


Born: Mar. 29, 1932, Ludington, Mich…. Selected the World War II remains that would be interred in the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery… Retired as Master Chief Hospital Corpsman in 1977… Departed: Mar. 18, 2012… Interred at Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell, Fla.

Posted in Men of Valor

Ernest E. West Medal of Honor citation

Army MOH Citation

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Private Ernest Edison West (ASN: 52151286), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry above and beyond the call of duty while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, in action against enemy aggressor forces at Sataeri, Korea, on 12 October 1952. Private West voluntarily accompanied a contingent to locate and destroy a reported enemy outpost. Nearing the objective, the patrol was ambushed and suffered numerous casualties. Observing his wounded leader lying in an exposed position, Private First Class West ordered the troops to withdraw, then braved intense fire to reach and assist him. While attempting evacuation, he was attacked by three hostile soldiers employing grenades and small-arms fire. Quickly shifting his body to shelter the officer, he killed the assailants with his rifle, then carried the helpless man to safety. He was critically wounded and lost an eye in this action, but courageously returned through withering fire and bursting shells to assist the wounded. While evacuating two comrades, he closed with and killed three more of the foe. Private First Class West’s indomitable spirit, consummate valor, and intrepid actions inspired all who observed him, reflect the highest credit on himself, and uphold the honored traditions of the military service.


ewestBorn: Sept. 2, 1931 in Russell, Ky…. Discharged in 1953… Awarded at the White House on Jan. 12, 1954 by President Dwight Eisenhower… Also received the Purple Heart… Resides in Wurtland, Ky.

Posted in Men of Valor

Earnest E. West Medal of Honor citation

Army MOH Citation

The President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pleasure in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to

PRIVATE

ERNEST EDISON WEST

ARMY

for service as set forth in the following

CITATION:
The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Private Ernest Edison West (ASN: 52151286), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry above and beyond the call of duty while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, in action against enemy aggressor forces at Sataeri, Korea, on 12 October 1952. Private West voluntarily accompanied a contingent to locate and destroy a reported enemy outpost. Nearing the objective, the patrol was ambushed and suffered numerous casualties. Observing his wounded leader lying in an exposed position, Private First Class West ordered the troops to withdraw, then braved intense fire to reach and assist him. While attempting evacuation, he was attacked by three hostile soldiers employing grenades and small-arms fire. Quickly shifting his body to shelter the officer, he killed the assailants with his rifle, then carried the helpless man to safety. He was critically wounded and lost an eye in this action, but courageously returned through withering fire and bursting shells to assist the wounded. While evacuating two comrades, he closed with and killed three more of the foe. Private First Class West’s indomitable spirit, consummate valor, and intrepid actions inspired all who observed him, reflect the highest credit on himself, and uphold the honored traditions of the military service.


ewestBorn: Sept. 2, 1931 in Russell, Ky…. Discharged in 1953… Awarded at the White House on Jan. 12, 1954 by President Dwight Eisenhower… Also received the Purple Heart… Resides in Wurtland, Ky.

Posted in Men of Valor

Jack W. Kelso Medal of Honor citation

Navy MOH CitationThe President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pride in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR (posthumously) to

PRIVATE FIRST CLASS

JACK WILLIAM KELSO

MARINE CORPS

for service as set forth in the following

CITATION:

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pride in presenting the Medal of Honor (Posthumously) to Private First Class Jack William Kelso (MCSN: 1190839), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty on 2 October 1952, while serving as a rifleman of Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea. When both the platoon commander and the platoon sergeant became casualties during the defense of a vital outpost against a numerically superior enemy force attacking at night under cover of intense small-arms, grenade, and mortar fire, Private First Class Kelso bravely exposed himself to the hail of enemy fire in a determined effort to reorganize the unit and to repel the onrushing attackers. Forced to seek cover, along with four other Marines, in a nearby bunker which immediately came under attack, he unhesitatingly picked up an enemy grenade which landed in the shelter, rushed out into the open and hurled it back at the enemy. Although painfully wounded when the grenade exploded as it left his hand, and again forced to seek the protection of the bunker when the hostile fire became more intensified Private First Class Kelso refused to remain in his position of comparative safety and moved out into the fire-swept area to return the enemy fire, thereby permitting the pinned-down Marines in the bunker to escape. Mortally wounded while providing covering fire for his comrades, Private First Class Kelso, by his valiant fighting spirit, aggressive determination, and self-sacrificing efforts in behalf of others, served to inspire all who observed him. His heroic actions sustain and enhance the highest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.


Born: Jan. 23, 1934 in Madera, Calif…. Joined Marine Corps at age 17 in 1951… Also awarded Silver Star and two Purple Hearts… Interred: Washington Colony Cemetery in Fresno, Calif.

Posted in Men of Valor

Henry Svehla Medal of Honor citation

Army MOH CitationThe President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pleasure in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR (posthumously) to

PRIVATE FIRST CLASS

HENRY SVEHLA

ARMY

for service as set forth in the following

CITATION:

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to (Posthumously) to Private First Class Henry Svehla (ASN: RA-21748254), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Private First Class Svehla distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Pyongony, Korea, on 12 June 1952. That afternoon, while Private First Class Svehla and his platoon were patrolling a strategic hill to determine enemy strength and positions, they were subjected to intense enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire at the top of the hill. Coming under heavy fire, the platoon’s attack began to falter. Realizing the success of mission and the safety of the remaining troops were in peril, Private First Class Svehla leapt to his feet and charged the enemy positions, firing his weapon and throwing grenades as he advanced. In the face of this courage and determination, the platoon rallied to attack with renewed vigor. Private First Class Svehla, utterly disregarding his own safety, destroyed enemy positions and inflicted heavy casualties, when suddenly, fragments from a mortar round exploding nearby seriously wounded him in the face. Despite his wounds, Private First Class Svehla refused medical treatment and continued to lead the attack. When an enemy grenade landed among a group of his comrades, Private First Class Svehla, without hesitation and undoubtedly aware of extreme danger, threw himself upon the grenade. During this action, Private First Class Svehla was mortally wounded. Private First Class Svehla’s extraordinary heroism and selflessness at the cost of his own life, above and beyond the call of duty, are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.


Born: Circa 1932…. His body was never recovered… Originally presented with the Distinguished Service Cross until upgraded to the Medal of Honor in 2011

Posted in Men of Valor

George A. Davis Jr. Medal of Honor citation


The President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pride in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR posthumously to

MAJOR

GEORGE ANDREW DAVIS, JR.

AIR FORCE

For service as set forth in the following:

CITATION:

For The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pride in presenting the Medal of Honor (Posthumously) to Major George Andrew Davis, Jr. (ASN: 0-671514/13035A), United States Air Force, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with the 334th Fighter Squadron, 4th Fighter Wing, Fifth Air Force in action against enemy forces near Sinuiju-Yalu River, Korea, on 10 February 1952. While leading a flight of four F-86 Saberjets on a combat aerial patrol mission near the Manchurian border, Major Davis’ element leader ran out of oxygen and was forced to retire from the flight with his wingman accompanying him. Major Davis and the remaining F-86’s continued the mission and sighted a formation of approximately twelve enemy MIG-15 aircraft speeding southward toward an area where friendly fighter-bombers were conducting low level operations against the Communist lines of communications. With selfless disregard for the numerical superiority of the enemy, Major Davis positioned his two aircraft, then dove at the MIG formation. While speeding through the formation from the rear he singled out a MIG-15 and destroyed it with a concentrated burst of fire. Although he was now under continuous fire from the enemy fighters to his rear, Major Davis sustained his attack. He fired at another MIG-15 which, bursting into smoke and flames, went into a vertical dive. Rather than maintain his superior speed and evade the enemy fire being concentrated on him, he elected to reduce his speed and sought out still a third MIG-15. During this latest attack his aircraft sustained a direct hit, went out of control, then crashed into a mountain 30 miles south of the Yalu River. Major Davis’ bold attack completely disrupted the enemy formation, permitting the friendly fighter-bombers to successfully complete their interdiction mission. Major Davis, by his indomitable fighting spirit, heroic aggressiveness, and superb courage in engaging the enemy against formidable odds exemplified valor at its highest.


Born: Dec. 1, 1920, Dublin, Texas… Enlisted in Army in 1942 before becoming aviation cadet… One of only seven US pilots to become an ace in two conflicts, shooting down seven Japanese planes during World War II and 14 during the Korean War… One of only 30 US pilots to shoot down over 20 enemy planes… Also awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, three Silver Stars, three Distinguished Flying Crosses, and the Purple Heart

Posted in Men of Valor

Ronald E. Rosser Medal of Honor Citation

Army MOH CitationThe President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pleasure in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to

CORPORAL
RONALD EUGENE ROSSER
ARMY

for service as set forth in the following

CITATION:

For conspicuous gallantry above and beyond the call of duty while serving with Headquarters Company (Heavy Mortar), 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action against enemy aggressor forces at Ponggilli, Korea, on 12 January 1952. While assaulting heavily fortified enemy hill positions, Company L, 38th Infantry Regiment, was stopped by fierce automatic-weapons, small-arms, artillery, and mortar fire. Corporal Rosser, a forward observer was with the lead platoon of Company L, when it came under fire from two directions. Corporal Rosser turned his radio over to his assistant and, disregarding the enemy fire, charged the enemy positions armed with only carbine and a grenade. At the first bunker, he silenced its occupants with a burst from his weapon. Gaining the top of the hill, he killed two enemy soldiers, and then went down the trench, killing five more as he advanced. He then hurled his grenade into a bunker and shot two other soldiers as they emerged. Having exhausted his ammunition, he returned through the enemy fire to obtain more ammunition and grenades and charged the hill once more. Calling on others to follow him, he assaulted two more enemy bunkers. Although those who attempted to join him became casualties, Corporal Rosser once again exhausted his ammunition obtained a new supply, and returning to the hilltop a third time hurled grenades into the enemy positions. During this heroic action Corporal Rosser single-handedly killed at least three of the enemy. After exhausting his ammunition he accompanied the withdrawing platoon, and though himself wounded, made several trips across open terrain still under enemy fire to help remove other men injured more seriously than himself. This outstanding soldier’s courageous and selfless devotion to duty is worthy of emulation by all men. He has contributed magnificently to the high traditions of the military service.


Born: Oct. 24, 1929 in Columbus, Ohio… Oldest of 17 children… Left high school to join the Army, serving from 1946-1949… Vowed revenge for his brother’s death in Korea and re-enlisted in Army, volunteering for combat duty… Presented Medal of Honor by Pres. Harry S. Truman on June 27, 1952