Arthur Jackson’s one man assault at Pelelieu

Pres. Harry S. Truman presents the Medal of Honor to Jackson at the White House on Oct. 5, 1945.

Pres. Harry S. Truman presents the Medal of Honor to Jackson at the White House on Oct. 5, 1945.[/caption]Today we honor the memory of recently departed Medal of Honor recipient Arthur J. Jackson. On Sept. 18, 1944 on Pelelieu, Private First Class Jackson charged towards a large enemy pillbox containing 35 Japanese soldiers. Facing an intensive barrage, he suppressed the enemy with automatic weapons fire and then destroyed the fortification with grenades and explosives, killing all of the occupants. Despite incoming fire from all sides, Jackson single-handedly moved on another 11 positions, killing 15 more of the enemy.

For his incredible one-man assault, Jackson is awarded the Medal of Honor. His citation can be viewed here.

Jackson was wounded on Pelelieu and again at Okinawa, where he served as a platoon sergeant. He received a commission from the Marine Corps in August, 1945 and would serve in the Army during the Korean War. He returned to the Marines in 1952 and while serving at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, Jackson killed an alleged Cuban spy that attacked him. Fearing an international incident, the military silently discharged Jackson after the event. He entered the Army Reserves and ultimately reached the rank of Captain in 1954.

Jackson, one of the few surviving recipients of the Medal of Honor from World War II, passed away on June 14, 2017.

Posted on June 17, 2017 at 12:24 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
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Arthur J. Jackson Medal of Honor citation

Navy MOH Citation

The President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pleasure in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to

PRIVATE FIRST CLASS

ARTHUR JUNIOR JACKSON

MARINE CORPS

for service as set forth in the following

CITATION:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with the Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division, in action against enemy Japanese forces on the Island of Peleliu in the Palau group, 18 September 1944. Boldly taking the initiative when his platoon’s left flank advance was held up by the fire of Japanese troops concealed in strongly fortified positions, Private First Class Jackson unhesitatingly proceeded forward of our lines and, courageously defying the heavy barrages, charged a large pillbox housing approximately 35 enemy soldiers. Pouring his automatic fire into the opening of the fixed installation to trap the occupying troops, he hurled white phosphorus grenades and explosive charges brought up by a fellow Marine, demolishing the pillbox and killing all of the enemy. Advancing alone under the continuous fire from other hostile emplacements, he employed similar means to smash two smaller positions in the immediate vicinity. Determined to crush the entire pocket of resistance although harassed on all sides by the shattering blasts of Japanese weapons and covered only by small rifle parties, he stormed one gun position after another, dealing death and destruction to the savagely fighting enemy in his inexorable drive against the remaining defenses, and succeeded in wiping out a total of 12 pillboxes and 50 Japanese soldiers. Stouthearted and indomitable despite the terrific odds. Private First Class Jackson resolutely maintained control of the platoon’s left flank movement throughout his valiant one man assault and, by his cool decision and relentless fighting spirit during a critical situation, contributed essentially to the complete annihilation of the enemy in the southern sector of the island. His gallant initiative and heroic conduct in the face of extreme peril reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Jackson and the United States Naval Service.


Born: Oct. 18, 1924 in Cleveland… Also saw action in the Cape Gloucester and Okinawa campaigns… Received two Purple Hearts… Commissioned as a Marine Corps Second Lieutenant in August, 1945… Received a Letter of Commendation for saving a Marine’s life while exposed to entrenched Japanese forces on a steep hill… Medal of Honor awarded by Pres. Harry S. Truman at the White House on Oct. 5, 1945… Served in the Army during the Korean War… Returned to the Marines in 1952 and was silently discharged after killing an alleged Cuban spy that attacked him while serving at Guantanamo Bay… Joined the Army Reserve and promoted to Captain in 1954… Departed: June 14, 2017