F-35 Aileron Roll

Lt. Col. Brent Reinhardt completes a 360-degree roll in F-35A AF-1 with a full weapon load during a test flight from Edwards AFB, California, on 10 January 2014. The photo is a composite of seventeen images taken during the 360-degree roll. (Photo by Matthew Short)

Lt. Col. Brent Reinhardt completes a 360-degree roll in F-35A AF-1 with a full weapon load during a test flight from Edwards AFB, California, on 10 January 2014. The photo is a composite of seventeen images taken during the 360-degree roll. (Photo by Matthew Short)

 

Posted on February 23, 2014 at 14:47 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
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Weekend Matinee: The battle for Mali

In 2012, Taureg rebels known as the  National Movement for the Liberation of Azawad (NMLA) fought a rebellion against the Mali government. NMLA forces drove the military from Northern Mali and unilaterally declared independence. The jihadist groups Ansar al-Din, the Movement for Unity and Jihad in West Africa, and Al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb took advantage of the weakened political state in Northern Mali and quickly drove out MLNA forces, gaining control of Northern Mali.

Determined to deny an Islamist state at Europe’s doorstep, France launched Opération Serval in January, 2013, an operation to clear the jihadists from Mali. The French military, supported by forces from several nations, quickly repelled the jihadists. The video is a France2 documentary (English subtitles) featuring combat footage entirely shot by military cameras.

Posted on November 24, 2013 at 17:34 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
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How to enslave a country

“There are two ways to conquer and enslave a country. One is by the sword. The other is by debt.”

– John Adams

Posted on June 29, 2013 at 11:26 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
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Diamond formation

OFFUTT AIR FORCE BASE Neb.– The U.S. Navy’s Blue Angels, an F-18 demonstration team, perform breathtaking stunts in their famous diamond formation on Aug. 29, 2008. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Josh Plueger)

OFFUTT AIR FORCE BASE Neb.– The U.S. Navy’s Blue Angels, an F-18 demonstration team, perform breathtaking stunts in their famous diamond formation on Aug. 29, 2008. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Josh Plueger)

More on the Blue Angels at the Center for American Military History.

Posted on June 28, 2013 at 08:36 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
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June 26 in U.S. military history

Convair B-36A-1-CF (S/N 44-92004, the first -A model built) in flight. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Convair B-36A-1-CF (S/N 44-92004, the first -A model built) in flight. (U.S. Air Force photo)

1862: The Battle of Mechanicsville (Va.) — second of the Seven Days Battles — is fought between Union forces under the command of Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan and Brig. Gen. Fitz John Porter, and Confederates under Gen. Robert E. Lee. Though the Confederates suffer heavy losses in a series of futile attacks against Federal positions, Porter is forced to withdraw in the face of fresh Confederate forces under Maj. Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson.

1948: A day after the Soviet Union blockades West Berlin, 32 U.S. C-47 cargo planes loaded with supplies takeoff on the first flight of the Berlin Airlift. Over 2 million tons of supplies are delivered during the 15-month operation.

Across the Atlantic, Strategic Air Command receives its first B-36A “Peacekeeper.” The six-engine strategic bomber is the world’s largest warplane and, with a range over 6,000 miles, is the first unrefueled intercontinental bomber.

1963: President John F. Kennedy proclaims, “Ich bin ein Berliner,” as a Cold War expression of America’s support for West Berlin following East Germany’s erecting the Berlin Wall.

Posted on June 26, 2013 at 11:40 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
In: Military History

June 25 in U.S. military history

Colonel Lewis B. Puller, USMC. Studies the terrain before advancing to another enemy objective, during operations beyond Inchon, Korea, circa September 1950. He was in command of the Marine Regimental Combat Team One of the First Marine Division. Courtesy of the U.S. Naval Institute, Annapolis, Maryland, NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 93034.

Col. Lewis B. “Chesty” Puller, USMC, studies the terrain before advancing to another enemy objective, during operations beyond Inchon, Korea, circa September 1950. Puller was in command of the Marine Regimental Combat Team One of the First Marine Division. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Naval Institute)

1917: The first convoy of troop transport ships carrying the American Expeditionary Force arrives in France. More than two million Americans will serve on the battlefields of Western Europe, and over 50,000 will lose their lives during World War I.

1876: A 3,000-strong Native American allied force led by Lakota chief Sitting Bull wipes out five companies of cavalry led by Lt. Col. George A. Custer near the Little Bighorn River in modern-day Montana.

1918: After what Gen. John J. Pershing called “the most considerable engagement American troops had ever had with a foreign enemy,” Marines finally secure Belleau Wood.

1950: North Korean infantry, tanks, and aircraft cross the 38th Parallel into South Korea, launching the Korean War.

1996: Islamists detonate a massive truck bomb outside the Khobar Towers near Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, killing 19 American airmen and wounding hundreds more.

Posted on June 25, 2013 at 09:50 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
In: Military History

Saturday matinee: Fort Eben-Emael

Following World War I, the Belgians built a system of fortifications – similar to France’s Maginot Line – surrounding Liège to prevent another German invasion. Fort Eben-Emael, the largest fortress ever built, anchored the network and was completed in 1935. Eben-Emael featured multiple 60, 75, and 120mm gun emplacements protected by armor plating and reinforced concrete as thick as 13 feet. Barbed wire, cliffs, anti-aircraft batteries, machine guns and additional – albeit smaller – fortifications in the surrounding area protected the underground fort.

As the Wermacht moved west toward France in May, 1940, the Germans had to capture the bridges spanning the Albert Canal intact (they were rigged to detonate), and the guns at Eben-Emael had to be neutralized.

With some 1,200 soldiers manning the technologically advanced fortress, defeating Eben-Emael would be extraordinary difficult. But Adolf Hitler himself figured that a few dozen engineers with specialized explosives landing directly on top of the structure could pull off the operation.

What followed was the world’s first combat glider landing and perhaps one of the most daring raids in military history.

Posted on June 22, 2013 at 13:41 by Chris Carter · Permalink · 2 Comments
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Expendable

not-optimal-casualtiesToday’s Democrat Party views the United States military as nothing more than a political tool to further their agenda. And after Benghazi we see that our troops and intelligence operators are expendable if Democrats think sacrificing them is in their best political interests.

But don’t take it from me; just look at what they do.

Instead of preserving the world’s most effective combat force, the Democrat Party views the U.S. military as a massive source of funding (defense budget cuts), an opportunity to shore up political support through social engineering (allowing openly gay service members), and a means to further their liberal internationalist agenda (so-called “Responsibility to Protect” operations like Libya).

They know that the military community tends to vote strongly Republican, which partly explains their open contempt of the men and women that serve in the Armed Forces – whether falsely labeling them cold-blooded murderers (Rep. John Murtha), comparing them to Nazis, KGB, and the Khmer Rouge (Sen. Dick Durbin), joking about their intelligence (Sec. John Kerry)… the examples of the Democrat Party’s distaste for the military could easily fill an entire article.

But throughout American history, our troops knew at least if they were wounded, in danger of being overrun, or even killed, our military will do everything in its power to get rescue or recover you.

No one gets left behind. At least that’s how it used to be.

That is, until Benghazi, which has become one of the most dishonorable events in American history. When our consulate was attacked and overran, President Obama left Americans to die. Any rescue attempt was cut off – not by our enemies, but by the Obama administration.

Even worse than the tragic and preventable deaths of four Americans, Washington’s reaction over the last eight months shows the utter disregard the Democrat Party and media have for not only the fallen, but for all of our troops and operators.

I am not saying that each and every Democrat politician wanted those men to die. But can you name any Democrat politician that has said we need to get to the bottom of Benghazi? Has any Democrat even so much as distanced themself from their party’s callous disregard for the fallen? Washington can say they support the troops all day, it’s time they show us how they support our troops.

Since day one, the Democrat Party – primarily the Obama administration – and their media allies have sought to make the story go away. Since that didn’t work, they have resorted to distracting the American people and redirecting the focus by claiming Republicans are only making this an issue for political gain.

Just imagine if your son or daughter was killed in the attack and politicians reacted by saying that anyone trying to find out answers was only using the tragedy for political leverage. That really says something about our nation when the majority party can shamelessly stoop so low – and get away with it.

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Chinese aggression shows Law of the Sea treaty is worthless

southchinasea

Supporters of the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) would have us believe that the treaty makes the world a safer place. For 30 years, media, political, and even military elite have all called for ratification of UNCLOS.

But why should the U.S. ratify a treaty that, considering Chinese ongoing territorial aggression against its neighbors, we can see is useless when it comes to maintaining “peace, justice and progress for all peoples of the world,” as the charter states?

Chinese naval vessels recently violated UN law by using their fire control radar to target a Japanese naval destroyer and military helicopters operating near the disputed Senkaku/Diaoyu Islands in February.

The rocky, uninhabited islands belonged to the Japanese until after World War II, when the United States assumed temporary control. The islands returned to Japanese administration in 1972, but the Chinese didn’t voice their claim to the islands until a potentially significant oil field was discovered in the region later that decade.

For months, Chinese and Filipino vessels have maintained a delicate standoff over the Scarborough Shoals (Huangyan Island to China). Although 500 miles from the nearest Chinese port, Chinese fishing vessels flaunt the law by harvesting their catch within the UNCLOS-established exclusive economic zone of the Philippines, just 124 miles from their coast.

In 1947, the Chinese government claimed virtually all of the South China Sea in what has become known as the “Nine-Dash Line.” China, a member nation of UNCLOS, refuses to explain the details on how they reached their far-fetching boundary.

A U.S. diplomatic cable published by WikiLeaks states that a senior Chinese government maritime law expert admittedly did not know of any historical basis behind the “Nine-Dash Line.”

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Posted on February 28, 2013 at 12:13 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
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Georgia state house seeks to repeal the Seventeenth Amendment

100 years ago, the United States ratified an amendment to the Constitution that changed the way America chose its senators. The amendment’s supporters said that senators directly elected by the people would not only be more democratic, but also less corrupt and less susceptible to special interest influence.

Instead of reducing corruption, however, changing the method of Senate selection provided entirely new avenues of political exploitation by fundamentally transforming our federal government. Most importantly, the amendment destroyed the federalist structure that the Founding Fathers installed to protect state sovereignty.

Today, members of the Georgia state House of Representatives seek to restore state representation to the federal government by reviving the Founders’ original intent. The goal of House Bill 273 is “to protect the sovereignty of the states from the federal government and to give each individual state government representation in the federal legislative branch of government” by repealing the Seventeenth Amendment.

Of course, this resolution would not necessitate any action or response from the federal government should it pass, but it could spark a national debate on the concept of federalism, unconstitutional government, and the Founders’ original intent.

Why was the Seventeenth Amendment ratified?

As the Founding Fathers drafted the Constitution, they understood that free and independent states, fresh from a long and costly war with England, would not approve of a charter that required them to totally surrender their sovereignty to a new federal government. To balance the legitimate concerns of the states with the need to preserve the union and form a national government for mutual protection and prosperity, the Founders chose a federalist system of divided powers between the states and the proposed federal government.

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Posted on February 27, 2013 at 12:33 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
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