“Raider” Johnson, President and war hero?

LBJ swears in aboard Air Force One in Dallas, TX following the assasination of John F. Kennedy on 22 November, 1963. Visible on Johnson's left lapel is the Silver Star, which he wore prominently throughout his career as a politician.

LBJ swears in aboard Air Force One in Dallas, TX following the assasination of John F. Kennedy on 22 November, 1963. Visible on Johnson's left lapel is the Silver Star, which he wore prominently throughout his career as a politician.

Not exactly.

Did you know that Lyndon B. Johnson, the 36th President of the United States, was a recipient of the Silver Star?

“The most you can say about Lyndon Johnson and his Silver Star, is that surely one of the most undeserved Silver Stars in history because if you accept everything that he said, he would still in action for no more than 13 minutes and only as an observer,” said JBJ’s biographer Robert Caro in an interview on CNN. “Men who flew many missions, brave men, never got a Silver Star.”

If LBJ’s medal is fraudulent – and by all credible accounts it appears to be – this is  a disgrace to the men who earned the Silver Star, and those who are deserving of the medal, but were not awarded.

Lt CDR Lydon B. Johnson, USNR, and  Lt CDR Francis R. Stevens, USAAF, in Australia, 1942.

Lt CDR Lydon B. Johnson, USNR, and Lt CDR Francis R. Stevens, USAAF, in Australia, 1942.

Johnson’s citation reads:

“For gallantry in action in the vicinity of Port Moresby and Salamaua, New Guinea on June 9, 1942. While on a mission of obtaining information in the Southwest Pacific area, Lieutenant Commander Johnson, in order to obtain personal knowledge of combat conditions, volunteered as an observer on a hazardous aerial combat mission over hostile positions in New Guinea. As our planes neared the target area they were intercepted by eight hostile fighters. When, at this time, the plane in which Lieutenant Commander Johnson was an observer, developed mechanical trouble and was forced to turn back alone, presenting a favorable target to the enemy fighters, he evidenced marked coolness in spite of the hazards involved. His gallant action enabled him to obtain and return with valuable information.”

Johnson was merely an observer on the flight, and no one else on the plane was awarded a medal.

“I would say it’s a tissue of exaggerations,” added Caro. “He said that he flew on many missions, not one mission. He said that the crewmen — the other members of the Air Force group, were so admiring of him they called him ‘Raider’ Johnson — neither of these things are true.”

Posted on November 15, 2009 at 16:03 by Chris Carter · Permalink
In: Military History, Politics · Tagged with: , , ,

2 Responses

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  1. Written by UNTO THE BREACH » SFC Alwyn C. Cashe
    on September 25, 2011 at 09:30
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    [...] man did, he died doing so, and was only awarded the military’s third-highest medal for valor. Lyndon Johnson got a Silver Star for just riding on an [...]

  2. Written by weight loss programs
    on September 19, 2014 at 09:06
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    Thanks for finally writing about >UNTO THE BREACH

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