August 23 in U.S. Military History

The 28th Infantry Division marches down the Champs Élysées in Paris on Aug. 29, 1944

1942: While Japanese reinforcements depart Truk to join the fighting on Guadalcanal, American P-40 “Lightnings” with the 49th Fighter Group shoot down 15 Japanese fighters and bombers attempting to target the air base in Darwin, Australia.

1944: When Gen. George S. Patton’s Third Army reaches the Seine River, Adolf Hitler orders Gen. Hans Speidel to destroy all bridges in Paris – which Speidel ignores, as well as another order days later to target Paris with V-1 and V-2 flying bombs. Speidel’s garrison will surrender in two days and the 28th Infantry Division will parade through the streets of Paris, ending four years of Nazi occupation.

1950: Over 70,000 Army Reservists are ordered to report for duty during the Korean War.

1954: A Lockheed YC-130 prototype takes off for its first flight – a 61-minute trip from the Lockheed plant in Burbank, Calif., to Edwards Air Force Base. 63 years later, the amazingly versatile C-130 “Hercules” remains in production, providing transportation, air assault, special operations, gunship, search and rescue, aerial refueling, aerial firefighting, and numerous other capabilities to the United States Armed Forces and dozens of other nations.

1990: As American forces continue deployment to the Persian Gulf for Operation “Desert Shield”, 46,000 Reservists are called up.

1996: Osama bin Laden issues his first fatwa, declaring war on the United States for, among other reasons, maintaining a military presence in Saudi Arabia. The founder of the terrorist group Al Qaeda’s message isn’t taken seriously until bombs kill over 200 people at American embassies in Tanzania and Kenya two years later.

 

Posted on August 23, 2017 at 08:19 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
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Aug. 22 in U.S. Military History

P4M-1Q Mercator of the VQ-2 Electronics Reconnaissance Squadron

1776: A force of over 20,000 Redcoats led by Gen. William Howe land on Long Island, N.Y.. Over the next few days the British will force the Americans to withdraw to New Jersey, and the British capture the vital port of New York City – which they hold for the duration of the war.

1914: During the opening days of World War I, the world is introduced to a level of violence on a scale never before seen as the German army kills 27,000 French soldiers in one day at Ardennes and Charleroi. By month’s end, the Battle of the Frontiers will account for over a quarter million French casualties – with 75,000 killed in action. Meanwhile, the French, British, and Belgian troops manage to inflict 200,000 casualties on German General Helmuth von Moltke’s invasion force.

1942: Elements of Gen. Friedrich Paulus’ Sixth Army begin arriving outside Stalingrad, beginning what would become perhaps the largest and deadliest engagement in human history – claiming some 2 million casualties over the course of the battle. The Sixth Army will be surrounded and wiped out after five brutal months of urban combat, and only 6,000 of the 107,000 prisoners will survive the war.

1945: As Japanese forces surrender across Asia, American aircraft drop several teams of French colonial administrators into French Indochina (present-day Vietnam).

1956: Chinese fighters engage a U.S. Navy P4M “Mercator” flying a nighttime patrol over international waters, killing all 16 crew members. During the Cold War, communist warplanes will shoot down several Mercator electronic surveillance aircraft.

Posted on August 22, 2017 at 08:50 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
In: Military History · Tagged with: , , ,

Liberty and Security Headlines for Aug. 21, 2017

National Security

Cold Civil War

Posted on August 21, 2017 at 10:59 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
In: Military Roundup

Aug. 21 in U.S. Military History

Grumman F8F Bearcat fighters ready for takeoff aboard the Essex-class aircraft carrier, USS Tarawa (CV-40) circa 1948. (U.S. Navy photo)

1942: On Guadalcanal, around 900 soldiers of Japan’s 17th Army slam into about 2,500 Marines manning positions along Alligator Creek. Wave after wave of Japanese soldiers are cut down by the Marines, killing well over 700 attackers – including the Japanese commander – while inflicting nearly 100 percent casualties.

1944: The F8F-1 “Bearcat” – Grumman’s last piston-powered fighter – makes its first flight. The warplane can fly faster and climb more quickly than the venerable “Hellcat”, but enters service too late to see action in World War II. The Blue Angels will begin using the Bearcat for their demonstrations, and many Navy and Marine aviators – including Neil Armstrong – consider the agile warplane as their favorite.

1957: The Soviet Union launches the R-7 “Semyorka”, the world’s first intercontinental ballistic missile. The R-7 was capable of carrying a 3-ton nuclear warhead a distance of over 5,000 miles away.

1959: President Dwight D. Eisenhower signs an executive order granting statehood to the territory of Hawaii, and Capt. Daniel Inouye (USA, Ret.) begins what will be a career spanning 53 years in Congress. During World War II, Inouye served in the highly decorated all-Nisei 442d Regimental Combat Team. He lost his arm during a daring attack on German machine gun positions in Italy, in which the already wounded officer had to pry a live grenade from his severed hand and used it to destroy a bunker. For his actions, Inouye was eventually awarded the Medal of Honor.

1965: A Titan II rocket blasts off from Cape Canaveral, carrying Gemini V astronauts Col. “Gordo” Cooper (USAF) and Lt. Cmdr. “Pete” Conrad (USN) into space to spend what Conrad refers to as “eight days in a garbage can.” The long, cramped spaceflight marks the first time Americans set the endurance record for time in space.

1980: During a Western Pacific patrol, the nuclear-powered cruiser USS Truxtun (CGN-35) and the destroyer USS Merrill (DD-976) rescue over 100 Vietnamese refugees some 200 miles southeast of Saigon.

Posted on August 21, 2017 at 09:10 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
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VICE News Tonight attends Richland County (S.C.) Sheriff’s Dept. training for HBO segment

By W. Thomas Smith Jr.

COLUMBIA, S.C. – Vice News Tonight, billed as covering “underreported stories,” was in town this week, touring the Richland County Sheriff’s Dept. (RCSD) headquarters, talking with deputies and other officers, filming, interviewing Sheriff Leon Lott, and attending a portion of the RCSD’s Critical Incident and PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) Awareness training.

“It’s not only important that we provide this pre-PTSD conditioning for our deputies,” says Sheriff Lott [pictured here with VICE News reporters, Thurs. afternoon]. “We need to be able to share with other agencies, nationwide, the value of this training; and hopefully get those agencies to appreciate the importance of developing and conducting similar training for their own officers.”

Lott adds, “Thanks to programs like Vice News Tonight on HBO – even LIVE PD on A&E – we’re better able to tell our story to the benefit of other agencies and departments around the country.”

First broadcast in Oct. 2016, Vice News Tonight is a nightly news program airing weeknights on HBO. A spin-off of VICE, a weekly documentary TV series, Vice News Tonight is HBO’s first-ever daily/nightly television series.

VICE News Tonight airs Mon.-Thurs. evenings at 7:30 p.m. (Eastern) on HBO, whereas VICE on HBO airs Fri. evenings, 7:30 p.m. and 11:00 p.m. The segments filmed this week at RCSD headquarters in Columbia will air within the next few weeks, time and date to be determined.

For more information about the Richland County Sheriff’s Dept., visit http://rcsd.net/.

Posted on August 12, 2017 at 13:58 by Chris Carter · Permalink · One Comment
In: Articles, Society

A Path to War

By Col. Steven B. Vitali, USMC (Ret.)

The United States is positioned on a trajectory toward a “hot war” with North Korea to end that country’s nuclear intercontinental threat.

To avoid a conflict, only two options are available:

First, the U.S. must strongly demonstrate to China and North Korea by various military, monetary, and strategic actions that America will end North Korea’s nuclear ambitions, even at the cost of a preemptive strike. The objective is to effectively persuade China to act against North Korea’s nuclear intentions.

The second alternative is to abandon the U.S.’s stated-policy of not allowing North Korea (or Iran) the ability to threaten the U.S. with nuclear weapons. This appeasement strategy is now the platform of Democrat politicians who enabled North Korea to sustain and fund their nuclear ambition over the last two decades.

Discredited former National Security Advisor, Susan Rice stated, “The U.S. can tolerate nuclear weapons in North Korea.” Her shocking appeasement appraisal stands in stark and foreboding recognition of the division that divides Americans today. The inability to acknowledge that evil exists in the world and the resilience to confront it and stop it is a departure from American historical precedence.

Rice advocates tolerance of nuclear blackmail as if a policy of mutual deterrence exists.

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Posted on August 12, 2017 at 10:35 by Chris Carter · Permalink · One Comment
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Nigeria’s complex environmental damage needs real solutions, not more litigation

Energy and environmental expert proposes path beyond business as usual

By Chris Carter

“We are information rich, but knowledge poor,” so-says energy and environmental expert Tom Mullikin. “Worse; we are starving for informed leadership.”

Mullikin, an experienced international energy and environmental attorney and problem solver is speaking of what he refers to as “the inordinately complex environmental issues the world is facing; Issues that no one wants to touch, because the issues are either too politically charged or too complicated and expensive to deal with,” he says.

That or they are seemingly impossible for any one person or one company to get their heads around. “Perhaps it’s also the old out-of-sight, out-of-mind mentality,” Mullikin says. “Most people view an environmental mess on another continent as if it were happening in another world.”

Mullikin points to the ongoing struggles to address oil-related contamination in places like Ecuador and Nigeria (the West African nation dubbed “one of the world’s greatest avoidable ecological disasters”) as examples of existing environmental problems with no hint of a solution.

“It’s just endless litigation and untold millions of dollars spent,” Mullikin says. “Meanwhile people’s lives are at stake.”

According to reports, an army of attorneys (on both sides) have attempted various legal strategies to address the problems resulting from within the Niger-Delta areas of Nigeria. Claimants have demanded that energy producers clean-up contamination resulting from their operations, physically restore the impacted environs of Nigeria, and pay huge damages for the lands “left devastated by pollution caused by repeated oil leaks.”

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Posted on August 11, 2017 at 11:23 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
In: Articles, Geopolitics

Aug. 11 in U.S. military history

1945: While American planes continue hammering Japanese facilities, Secretary of State James Byrnes rejects the Japanese War Council’s surrender terms, including the the Emperor would remain in power. The Allies’ terms dictate that the Japanese people themselves would determine their own form of government and that the Emperor would be subject to the Supreme Allied Commander.

1949: President Harry Truman appoints Gen. Omar Bradley to the new position of Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Bradley advises that the post-World War II Army had been weakened to the point that it “could not fight its way out of a paper bag,” but the Truman administration does not implement his recommendations. As a result, the United States military enters the Korean War significantly understaffed and with outdated equipment.

1952: In western Korea, the First Marine Division takes Hill 122 – subsequently named “Bunker Hill” – and begins several days of bloody clashes with Chinese troops. The Marines, supported by tanks and and air strikes, repel numerous communist assaults and drive off the enemy. 48 of Col. Walter F. Layer’s men give their lives in defense of the hill, but inflict several thousand Chinese casualties.

1965: When deadly race riots break out across Los Angeles, the California National Guard deploys over 12,000 Guardsmen to the area to restore order.

1967: While on a patrol in South Vietnam’s Quảng Nam Province, Marine Lance Cpl. Roy M. Wheat accidentally steps on an enemy “Bouncing Betty” anti-personnel mine. When he hears the distinctive sound made by the triggered fuze, Wheat throws himself over the mine’s location and absorbs the blast with his body. For his actions, Wheat is posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor.

Posted on August 11, 2017 at 09:40 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
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SEALs in Space: NASA and the Next Generation of Astronauts

[Originally published at OpsLens.com]

Former SEAL Jonny Kim (NASA photo)

This month, NASA’s group of 12 candidates begin their two-year training program to become the nation’s next generation of astronauts. Among them is Jonny Kim, a physician and former special operator with the Navy SEALs.

Kim enlisted in the Navy in 2002 and entered Naval Special Warfare Training Center in Coronado, Calif. After graduation, he was assigned to SEAL Team Three in San Diego, where he served as a combat medic, sniper, navigator, and point man on 100 combat missions during his two tours in the Middle East. Kim was awarded both the Silver Star and the Bronze Star with the Combat “V” device for valor as well as the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal with the Combat “V.”

Kim’s astronaut training focuses on “International Space Station systems, robotics, Russian language, flying T-38 training jets, and spacewalk training,” Brandi Dean of NASA’s public affairs office informs OpsLens.

“In addition, they’ll have activities that build what we call expeditionary skills – things like leadership, followership, team care, and communication,” Dean adds.

All traits Kim undoubtedly excelled at as a member of Naval Special Warfare.

Once he completes his two-year training program, Kim will be considered a “full astronaut” and is eligible for mission assignment, with the possibly of a trip to Mars not yet out of the question.

However, Kim will not be the first, or even the second SEAL that NASA found to have “the right stuff.”

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Posted on August 11, 2017 at 09:11 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
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Liberty and Security Headlines for Aug. 3, 2017

The Cold Civil War

War on Jihad/War of Ideas

Other news

Photo of the day

Posted on August 3, 2017 at 10:11 by Chris Carter · Permalink · Leave a comment
In: Military Roundup