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Posted in Articles

Deputy retires, celebrates 90th birthday on same day

COLUMBIA, S.C. – Forty-plus Richland County Sheriff’s Department (RCSD) patrol vehicles, including two RCSD motorcycles, assembled at Cardinal Newman High School in northeast Columbia before converging on the nearby Waterford retirement community, Tues. morning, Apr. 21, where deputies passed-in-review before retiring Reserve Deputy Dewight Thomas, a resident of the Waterford.

“We wanted to do something special for Dewight who not only retired this week, but he turned 90-years-old on the same day,” said Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott. “Since we couldn’t have him celebrate with us at our offices because of the current COVID-19 threat, we thought we’d host a processional parade in his honor and for all the residents of the Waterford to see and enjoy with him.” Continue reading “Deputy retires, celebrates 90th birthday on same day”

Posted in Articles

First-of-its-kind South Carolina expedition planned for July

By Alex Junes-Ward

COLUMBIA, S.C. – Pandemic shutdown aside, Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Tom Mullikin remains hopeful and is working: In fact, he’s busy planning and conditioning himself for his next big expedition, this one no less ambitious than previous excursions but a bit closer to home. In July 2020, Mullikin will embark on his CAROLINA 7 expedition, a first-of-its-kind mission that will have the global expedition leader hiking the length-and-breadth of the Palmetto State from the mountains to the sea.

So-named for the seven geographic wonders unique to South Carolina, Mullikin’s route will include each segment of the Palmetto Trail, an approximate 500-mile stretch from the Blue Ridge Mountains in the Upstate to the Ashepoo, Combahee and Edisto Basin (aka ACE Basin) in the Lowcountry.

“This will be something of record-setting expedition, not so much in terms of the time it takes for us to complete it, but in terms of the magnificent destinations across South Carolina that we will enjoy along the way,” says Mullikin, an energy and environmental attorney, former Army officer, and retired commanding general of the S.C. State Guard who has spent much of the last four decades traversing every continent on earth, climbing mountain ranges of the world’s seven tallest peaks (including reaching the summits of more than 20 mountains across the globe) and logging SCUBA dives in all the world’s five oceans. “This hike across our state will, I believe, be unlike any exploratory expedition ever done before at any point in our state’s history. Our expedition is intended to raise awareness of the unbelievably beautiful and historic sites across South Carolina – from the mountains to the sea.” Continue reading “First-of-its-kind South Carolina expedition planned for July”

Posted in Military History

9 April: This day in military history

Pfc. Ambrose

Today’s post is in honor of Pfc. Gregory F. Ambrose, who was killed during a firefight on 15 March 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam’s Gia Dinh province. Pfc. Ambrose had served in Vietnam for just under a year, assigned to B Company, 1st Battalion, 18th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division and was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star Medal with Combat “V.”


1865: The war lost, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee concludes, “There is nothing left for me to do, but to go and see Gen. [Ulysses S.] Grant, and I would rather die a thousand deaths.”

Lee formally surrenders the Army of Northern Virginia to Grant at the home of Wilmer McLean in the village of Appomattox Court House, Virginia. Still-operating Confederate forces will surrender within months.

94th Aero Squadron pilots (left to right) Eddie Rickenbacker, Douglas Campbell, and Kenneth Marr in front of a Nieuport fighter. (U.S. Army image)

1918: The famed 94th “Hat in the Ring” Aero Squadron moves up to the Croix de Metz Aerodrome in France, becoming the first American aviation outfit to enter combat. In May, Lt. Douglas Campbell becomes the first American-trained pilot to earn “ace” status, and fellow squadron mate Lt. Eddie Rickenbacker – who will ultimately become America’s top flying ace of World War I – scores his fifth victory in June.

1942: Having run out of food, ammunition, and supplies after months of fighting the Japanese, Maj. Gen. Edward P. King surrenders over 11,000 American and 60,000 Filipino forces under his command on Luzon Island to the Japanese. Immediately after the fall of Bataan, the Japanese begin bombarding Lt. Gen. Jonathan M. Wainwright and some 10,000 troops now isolated on the island fortress of Corregidor, who will manage to hold out for a month before they must surrender as well. Continue reading “9 April: This day in military history”

Posted in Military History

3 April: Today in U.S. military history

The Martin B-57A Canberra. (U.S. Air Force photo)

1865: A day after the Confederate government evacuates by rail, Union troops march into the Confederate capital of Richmond, Va. Retreating Soldiers and citizens set buildings on fire as they depart, and the conflagration will consume some 35 blocks of Richmond. It takes Union soldiers until the afternoon to contain the blaze. President Abraham Lincoln tours the captured city the next day.

The Civil War will be over in just six days.

1942: Japan’s 14th Army, led by Lt. Gen. Masaharu Homma, launches a major offensive against American and Filipino forces on the Bataan Peninsula. In six days, the 75,000 defenders, already weakened by starvation and disease, will have no choice but to surrender to the Japanese.

1946: Gen. Homma is convicted of nearly 50 counts of war crimes for his troops’ treatment of prisoners in the Bataan Death March, and is executed by firing squad. Continue reading “3 April: Today in U.S. military history”

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COVID-19 RESPONSE: Global Expedition Leader on the Current Pandemic

CAMDEN, S.C. – Energy and environmental attorney Tom Mullikin is not only working but training every single day, “without fail,” he says, during the coronavirus pandemic. He’s doing it while encouraging others and assisting family and friends in his hometown of Camden (one of the earliest-and-hardest hit regions in terms of the virus) and elsewhere around the state.

“Uncertain times like these are all the more reason to live purposeful lives,” Mullikin says. “To get through this pandemic – including the public fear of infection, of upended lives, and volatile markets and market predictions – we have to get up every day with purpose and drive, even if that drive is not naturally occurring at the moment.”

Last week, Mullikin – along with Dr. Tallulah Holmstrom, chief medical officer of Kershaw Health; and Kershaw County Sheriff Lee Boan – released a public service announcement, which not only raised the banner for safety and best health practices going forward, but the PSA encouraged the public to take heart and “be strong.”

Holmstrom and Boan both urged continued social distancing measures.

Mullikin said, “Kershaw County has led the way in our nation, since we fought and won our Independence, and we will continue to meet great challenges. We will lead the way in defeating the coronavirus through our responsible actions.”

[Please see – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WlW30X-2IVM&feature=] Continue reading “COVID-19 RESPONSE: Global Expedition Leader on the Current Pandemic”